How to teach children Dutch

How to teach children Dutch

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1 Get fairy tales and storybooks in Dutch on Amazon or from your local library

Children love shared reading time and regardless of language acquisition they will always remember the time they spent with you reading books.Try to find books with good illustrations. Look at the pictures with your child, point to things they already know in Dutch.

As you come across new words ask the child what they think it is. If it is illustrated, have them point it out on the page.Use different voices for different characters.If your child has a favorite Dutch story encourage him/her to play different characters making up the words from memory. Help your child to use his/her imagination to change the story or change the ending.

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2 Use puppets or turn your child’s favorite plush toy into a puppet that talks in Dutch

Kids love puppets and puppet play is great for motor skills. You can tell much loved stories through puppet play, either using the whole body or make a puppet theatre from a box and use hand or finger puppets. Finger puppets are also fun when singing songs.

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3 Go to the zoo and call the name of the animals together in Dutch

If you have any, look at some animal books together, then go to the zoo for the day. Ask your child the names of the animals he/she has learned and point out the new ones. This is a great place to add in adjectives and colours. When you come home, encourage your child to draw pictures of what he/she saw and talk about them together using Dutch.

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4 Play hide and seek by counting in Dutch

Hide and seek is a great game for practicing numbers. You could start with 1 to 10 and gradually increase. When your child knows them well you could count down backwards. When ‘seeking’ your child it’s a good opportunity to repeat words without it sounding repetitive.

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5 Play board games in Dutch e.g.: snakes and ladders, board games, family games

Dice games are always good for counting and also simple addition. Board games played with the whole family can be a time for relaxed learning. Just playing a simple board game such as snakes and ladders teaches a young child so much more than just language. They also learn rules of play, understanding goals and of course, that family games equal FUN!

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6 Play games by using flashcard games e.g.: Go fish, memory game

Flashcards are one of your most valuable resources in teaching language to young children. With multiples of the same cards you can play well-known games such as Go Fish or the ‘memory game’.

Very small children may struggle to hold too many cards, so play games that have the child match one card to another. Match a sound with a picture, or two cards that have the same sound, or two pictures that match, any way you choose.

Lay cards out on the floor or table and have your child touch the card as you call out words/sounds. Encourage your child to be the caller and you touch the cards. Keep it playful and fun.

 

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7 Have a progress chart that tracks the words and phrases your child mastered

A simple progress chart teaches your child clear goals and kids love stickers. Let your child know when he/she is approaching a goal, make a big deal of reaching the goals, be excited to getting the stickers out. Praise him/her for their achievement with a ‘great job’, a hug or a ‘high five’ (or all three).

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8 Listen to children’s songs in Dutch together or reward your child for memorizing a short one

Listen to children’s songs in the 2nd language whenever and wherever you can. Keep CDs in the car or put a CD on quietly in the background when you are doing something else. Add actions to the songs, this helps kids remember the words. If it suits your child’s personality, encourage them to ‘perform’ songs for you. You could have a special ‘song night’.

Here is a playlist of Dutch children’s songs

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9 Listen to pop songs in Dutch together or reward your child for memorizing a short one

Teach your child some catchy pop songs that you both like. Something with suitable lyrics and a good chorus are easiest to remember. Sing it around the house as you do other things, when your child tries to join in, model the language and encourage them to sing with you.

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10 Find cartoons in the 2nd language on Youtube or Amazon

Cartoons are a great way to engage kids in the 2nd language. Kids can figure out the story visually without worrying about not understanding every word. It’s easy to buy DVDs from Amazon in almost any language or, alternatively, look for them on YouTube. Let your child guide you to which cartoons they like best. Watch them together and you will know which language to reinforce.

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11 Have an annual/monthly goal check list

Make a checklist of goals or ideas of where you want to be with the language learning over a year. Break it down into monthly mini-goals.

It will be help you stay focused on where you are going and also a great way to look back and see how far you and your child have come.

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12 Create youtube playlists or find playlists suitable for your child’s level

YouTube is a super resource. You can create playlists of Dutch teaching videos, these days people post from all over the world.

They might be short tutorials, or craft ideas you can incorporate into your language learning, or children’s songs you can sing together. Look for playlists already put together by others with the same goal.

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13 Join online support groups (forums, facebook pages, twitter lists, multicultural blog groups etc.)

Join some online groups to exchange ideas and information. Support is invaluable too. Teaching Dutch can hit some hurdles, it is important to be able to connect with people who are having the same difficulties or have successfully navigated these hurdles. Facebook and Twitter are great for immediate connections. Online chat groups or forums can give you a sense of community and common goals.

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14 Visit the website of Netherlands’s ministry of culture

Have a look at the website and find interesting information about Netherlands. Read about traditional food, dances and costumes. Look at statistics such as population. Find some fun facts about the climate, holidays and customs. Talk about them with your child and follow their lead on which parts they are interested in. You can also get all this information and more here

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15 Go to public libraries and check all the available resources in Dutch

Libraries are an excellent resource. If they don’t have things things in Dutch ask the librarian if it is possible to order them. Also check out the noticeboard and see if there are any kids groups speaking Dutch in the area. You might make some new friends too.

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16 Make use of language learning DVDs for kids

Language DVDs come handy , especially fro busy parents, as they repeat useful words and phrases in a fun and interesting way Check them out, Look for something that is specifically for kids, that uses games and songs and has well-structured levels.

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17 Play CDs when driving your child to school

Always play CDs in Dutch when you are in the car. It could be songs or a kids’ language learning CD, whatever your child likes. Do it consistently so your child comes to expect the 2nd language in the car.

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18 Play streaming radio in the background at home or make use of Spotify, Lastfm, etc.

Nowadays, there are a lot of resources that help you play streaming radio through personal electronic devices and laptops, etc. All you need is tuning into one of the local radio stations and have the radio or the song list play in the background all day long. Even if your child does not understand what has been spoken or the lyrics of the songs he/she will get used to the new sounds and intonation patterns.

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19 Make use of worksheets for beginners

There are a great many websites offering worksheets for beginners. Many are free and some you can pay monthly or a yearly fee. Kids love worksheets. Some may be simple coloring sheets (kids LOVE coloring), or sheets that help fine motor skills through pencil manipulation. Buy some stickers and put one on each sheet your child completes.

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20 Make use of Flashcards

There is no end to the fun to be had from playing games with flashcards even if you child is still too young to play a game that has structure and rules. You can make your own ‘games’ call out a card, have your child touch it/pick it up. ‘Hide’ the cards around the room and have your child find them and say what they are etc.

You can also put the flashcards up around the room. Change them each week in categories (animals/flowers/ fruit/etc. Look at them and say them often with your child. Ask them, “What’s this? / What’s that?”

Put them on your fridge with magnets or let your child do this.You call out the words and have them put them on.

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21 Get a picture dictionary to get started

A Children’s picture dictionary is a wonderful resource. Follow your child’s curiosity with it. Let him/her choose what he/she wants to know on any given day. Ask him/her more information about the words they do know. “What color is it?” “ Is it big or small? “ “Where does it live?” “What does it do?”

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22 Consider getting an alphabet book

Introduce your child to the shapes of letters with a simple alphabet book. This is especially useful if the Dutch alphabet is different to that of the 1st language. For young learners, get a very simple, ‘starter’ book, also great for fine motor skills and pencil control.

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23 Think about kinesthetic learning (learning by doing). Coloring books, sketchbooks or DVDs that children watch and dance are great!

The research is in that kids learn best by doing (don’t we all?).

Anything that gets kids moving their bodies or their hands helps them to learn. Watch DVDs together, make up dances, put on ‘shows’, even dress up. Encourage your child’s inner artist with a sketchbook. Color, paint, draw, and talk about the colors and your child’s pictures in the 2nd language. Coloring in pictures is a very relaxing activity (you should do it too!) Kids tend to be very relaxed when they are coloring, a good time to make some general chitchat in Dutch.

Mix paints and talk in Dutch about how colors are made.

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24 Consider getting a reading pen

The very latest translation tool. A ‘reading pen’ scans and translates. The translated text appears on a small screen on the pen and can also provide audio pronunciation of words or full sentences.

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25 Find some talking or singing plush toys

There are so many talking toys on the market these days. Try one that says greetings in Dutch (or multiple languages) or one that sings traditional songs/nursery rhymes from Netherlands.

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26 Make use of culture books prepared for little kids

Ready made ‘culture books’ are great for learning about different countries. Read them together, ask questions and encourage your child to ask lots of questions too. After reading one, you could make a simple one together using pictures from magazines, or encourage your child to draw pictures too. Gather information together at the library or from the internet.

27 Decorate your child’s room with learning posters (colors, numbers) or pictures from Netherlands (flag, the cities, etc.)

Get some large colorful posters to decorate your child’s room or the learning space you use. Point things out and ask questions, swap roles and have your child ask the questions too, this also helps model the pronunciation. Ask which is your child’s favorite poster and why?

Follow their lead on the things that interest them.

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28 Follow a simple syllabus prepared for kids

Use the simple syllabus prepared in your language learning system or make one yourself. Let your child know what it is so he/she can see what they will be doing. Children tend to do better when they know what is coming and what is expected of them.

29 Use stickers as rewards (stickers that say congratulations, wonderful, etc. in the 2nd language)

Kids love stickers! Use them liberally. Take praising your child as an opportunity to use the 2nd language. If you can find stickers with words of praise in the 2nd language use those and repeat the words a lot. Use a couple of words at first and add more as your child knows them.

30 Get some printed items related to the 2nd language: T-shirts, mugs, children’s silverware, etc.

If you have the opportunity to visit the 2nd language country buy goods with the language on. T-shirts, mugs and pens are useful as well as educational. Look for postcards, posters or bumper stickers with popular expressions on. Post these around your house.

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31 Arrange play dates or playgroups with other parents who want to teach their children Dutch.

Try to find other parents encouraging their children to learn Dutch, arrange to play together, go on picnics to the park or take a trip to a zoo or aquarium, great places to practice the language. Making new friends is of great benefit to you too!

 

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32 Video chat with friends and relatives who have a child that speaks Dutch

Encourage video chat with other children you know, that speak Dutch. It’s easy using Skype or Google Hangouts or something similar. Be nearby to help the conversation along. Be encouraging and resist the temptation to correct your child’s mistakes.

 

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33 Invite Grandma and Grandpa (who can speak Dutch) to stay over

Spending time with grandparents is valuable to all parties anyway but spending time with grandparents who speak Dutch is great for strengthening bonds and hearing natural language. Your child will come to associate Dutch with feelings of love and security.

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34 Hire a short-term or full time nanny or caregiver that speaks Dutch

If it is possible, consider hiring a nanny/caregiver/babysitter who speaks Dutch. Even a few hours per week would make a difference (and give you a little free time!).

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35 Cook Dutch recipes together with your child

Kids always want to be a ‘little helper’ in the kitchen. Cook some simple dishes from Netherlands together. Us the 2nd language for instructions, wash, cut, wipe, mix…. Name the ingredients in a natural way as you cook. Here are some Dutch recipes

36 Go to community centers, cultural centers and temples with your child

Local places of interest are stimulating for your child and cultural centers often have exhibitions or music/dance performances. Look out for anything from Netherlands. Community centers are a great place to meet people, look at notice boards for anything from people interested or connected in some way to, Dutch. You could even offer to do something yourself, give a talk about the country or a traditional dance etc.

37 Visit Dutch supermarkets and Dutch restaurants with your child

Go around a Dutch supermarket and point out the foods from Netherlands. If your child is unfamiliar with them, ask questions. “How do you think it tastes?” “ Do you think this is hard/soft/crunchy/sweet/etc.?” If possible eat in ethnic restaurants. Talk about the food, how it is prepared, where it comes from.

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38 Have a word of the day activity

Pick a ‘word of the day’, you or your child could choose it, or have your child pick it at random from a pile of word cards. If the word is a noun, look for it around the house and when you go outside. Talk about where it might be found. If it is a verb, find ways to do the action either really or mime it, see if you can spot other people doing it? Or use adverbs and spend some time doing everything in the manner of the adverb, slowly/quickly/happily/etc.

39 Play Dutch online language games (memory, click&tell, etc.) with your child

There are plenty of free online interactive language games for children. Find one that appeals to your child and encourage them to do a little every day. You can check out 3 different kinds of free Dutch online language learning games here

 

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40 Try Skype lessons for children (may not be advised for infants and toddlers)

Many teachers are offering language lessons via Skype. Ask around and see if anyone can recommend a teacher to you. Sit in on the lesson too so you know what language to reinforce between lessons.

 

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41 Read bedtime stories in Dutch to your child

Books, books, books. Kids love books and stories. Read stories in Dutch before bed. Often when kids have heard a favorite story many times they know the words. Encourage your child to help tell the story.

42 Play Dutch children’s games

Many children’s games are the same the world over, play kids games your child already knows in their 1st language but play it in the 2nd language. Paper, rock, scissors has many variations; play it in the 2nd language. Hopscotch, skipping games, clapping games etc. can all be played in any language. For more ideas have a look at the games in the different ‘countries and cultures’ at Dino Lingo (to the right of this post).

43 Get comic books & children’s magazines from Netherlands

Ask if a friend or relative overseas can send you comics or children’s magazines in Dutch. Children’s magazines usually have lots of fun facts in them that you can talk about and further research. They also have quizzes and puzzles that are lots of fun to do.

44 Go to a national parade of the target culture

You could try to find where there is a large community of people from the target culture. They will no doubt have special events to celebrate the holidays of their country of origin. Take your child to their parades and festivals.

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45 Have a personalized notebook specially used for learning the2nd language(Don’t forget to use it to have your child draw whatever you say in the 2nd language

Let your child choose the notebook at the shop and decorate it anyway they want to make it special. Say words in Dutch and have them draw pictures, or even write the word or the first letter, depending on what level they are at. Go back over the pictures every few days. Talk about the pictures and praise your child’s drawing skills.

46 Do local crafts

If you are a native speaker of Dutch think about the crafts you did as a child and do them with your child (think also about how happy you were doing this activity with your own mother/father or your friends). Don’t worry if you have forgotten how, look on the Internet to refresh your memory. Perhaps you could send something your child makes to grandparents or relatives overseas.

47 Use chatting apps (WhatsApp, Line, etc.) to talk with friends and family who have same-aged children

Chatting apps are mobile and easy to use. Chat with friends in the 2nd who have children about the same age. Encourage your child to chat with them and their kids too. Ask their kids about themselves, their day etc. and encourage your child to talk about themselves.

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48 Sing lullabies in the 2nd language to put your baby asleep

Lullabies are so soothing for baby and parent. Sing some Dutch lullabies to help your baby sleep. You can buy wind-up crib music at a baby store. Play the music and sing in the Dutch. Establish is as a routine and enjoy the time holding your baby and knowing you are soothing him/her.

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49 Consider homeschooling by getting an online curriculum

More and more people are turning to homeschooling these days and there are plenty of resources online. Do some research and find something that suits you and your child. Depending on the school hours where you live, it may be possible for your child to attend the local school and follow a homeschooling curriculum.

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50 Send your child to a summer camp where he/she can study Dutch in a short time.

Summer camp is a great experience for children. It is often their first extended time away from home and a chance to make lots of new friends and try a variety of activities for the first time. ‘Language’ camps for kids usually incorporate study with lots of games/crafts/activities related to the 2nd language culture. Look online or on the notice board in community centers and other public buildings.

 

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Dutch Songs for Children – Dutch Culture for kids

1. Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Is Kortjakje goed gezond
 Altijd is Kortjakje ziek


Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet


’s-Zondags gaat zij naar de kerk


Met een boek vol zilverwerk

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek


Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

Midden in de week wil zij niet wassen


’s-Zondags strikt ze herendassen

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s zondags niet

‘s-Zondags als haar liefste komt

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek


Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

2. Slaap kindje slaap

Slaap, kindje, slaap

daar buiten loopt een schaap.

Een schaap met witte voetjes

dat drinkt zijn melk zo zoetjes.

Slaap, kindje, slaap

daar buiten loopt een schaap.

3. Zakdoekje leggen

Zakdoekje leggen

Niemand zeggen


Kukeleku zo kraait de haan


twee paar schoenen heb ik aan


Een van stof en een van leer

Hier leg ik mijn zakdoekje neer

Zakdoekje leggen

Niemand zeggen

Ik heb de hele nacht gewaakt

Twee paar schoenen heb ik afgemaakt


Een van stof en een van leer

Hier leg ik mijn zakdoekje neer

4. Zeg ken jij de mosselman

Zeg ken jij de mosselman,

de mosselman,

de mosselman

Zeg ken jij de mosselman,


die woont in Scheveningen

Ja ik ken de mosselman,

de mosselman,

de mosselman

Ja ik ken de mosselman,

die woont in Scheveningen

Samen kennen we de mosselman,

de mosselman,

de mosselman

Samen kennen we de mosselman,

die woont in Scheveningen

5. Hoedje van papier

Eén twee drie vier, hoedje van hoedje van.

Eén twee drie vier, hoedje van papier.


Als ‘t hoedje dan niet past,


Zet ‘t in de glazen kast.


Eén twee drie vier, hoedje van papier.

6. Ik zag twee beren


Ik zag twee beren


Broodjes smeren.

Oh, het was een wonder

Het was een wonder, boven wonder

Dat die beren smeren konden


Hi hi hi, ha ha

ha
Ik stond er bij en ik keek er naar

7. Alle eendjes zwemmen in het water


Alle eendjes zwemmen in het water

Falderalderiere

Falderalderare

Alle eendjes zwemmen in het water

Fal, fal, falderalderalderaldera

8. Berend Botje

Berend Botje ging uit varen

Met zijn scheepje naar Zuid-Laren

De weg was recht, de weg was krom


Nooit kwam Berend Botje weerom

Eén twee drie vier vijf zes zeven

Waar is Berend Botje gebleven

Hij is niet hier, hij is niet daar

Hij is naar Amerika

Amerika, Amerika


Drie maal in de rondte van je hopsa-sa


Amerika, Amerika

Drie maal in de rondte van je hopsa-sa

9. Zie ginds komt de stoomboot

Zie ginds komt de stoomboot


uit Spanje weer aan.


Hij brengt ons Sint Nicolaas
ik

zie hem al staan.


Hoe huppelt zijn paardje

het dek op en neer,

hoe waaien de wimpels

al heen en al weer.

Zijn knecht staat te lachen

en roept ons reeds toe:

Wie zoet is krijgt lekkers;

wie stout is de roe!

Oh, lieve Sint Nicolaas

kom ook eens bij mij

en rijd toch niet stilletjes


ons huisje voorbij!

10. Schipper mag ik overvaren

Schipper, mag ik overvaren.

Ja of nee?

Moet ik dan een cent betalen

Ja of nee?

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Dutch Traditional Music and Musical Instruments – Dutch Culture for kids

There is a long history of church organs and the mechanical street organ called the draaiorgel. The draairogel is a musical instrument that is played by moving musical patterns.  There is a turning pinned barrel or disc, or a cardboard or paper strip with holes in it.

The accordion, violin, recorder and harmonica also are used to play traditional folk music.

Traditional Dutch music is known as “Levenslied” meaning life song or song about life. These types of songs have catchy, simple rhythms and melodies.  They are sung with couplets (2 lines that rhyme) and a refrain (repeating a section over). The themes of the songs are often sentimental. They include love and happiness, death and loneliness.

Traditional Dutch musical instruments such as the accordion and the barrel organ are used in levenslied. However, recently many of these musicians also use synthesizers and guitars.

A barrel organ (or roller organ) is a mechanical musical instrument consisting of bellows and one or more ranks of pipes.  The pipes are in a decorated, wooden case. The basic principle is the same as a traditional pipe organ. Rather than being played by an organist, the barrel organ’s music is made from a person turning a crank.  It can also be made by clockwork moved by weights or springs. The pieces of music are encoded onto the wooden barrels or cylinders. This is similar to the keyboard of the traditional pipe organ.

Read More…

Dutch street organs unlike the simple street organ are large organs that play book music. They have many rows of pipes and also percussion.  At first, the organ grinder turned a large handle to make the music.  Today, most of the organ grinders have been changed to a small battery operated motor.  This leaves the street performer free to collect money from anyone passing by as the music is played on the street corners.

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About Dutch History – Dutch Culture for kids

The people who live in the Netherlands are called Dutch.  German tribes first lived on the land that is called the Netherlands.  Then Rome took part of the land away.  Parts of the Netherlands were later taken over by many other countries until the Dutch people decided they did not want to be ruled by anyone else.

The Dutch people wanted to be free and rule themselves.  So, in 1579, the Republic of the United Netherlands was formed.

In the 17th century, the Netherlands had a strong navy.  With this navy, they were able to expand their empire to other areas of the world.  They gained colonies on many of the other continents.

Eventually, the Netherlands was weakened by wars with other European countries.  There were wars against Spain, France and England.  Each time there was a war, the Netherlands lost some of their colonies.

The Netherlands fought in WWII against the Germans.  Anne Frank is a famous Jewish girl who wrote her diary of hiding from the Nazis during the war. She hid upstairs above a store with her family. After WWII, most of Netherland’s colonies were given freedom.

Today, the Netherlands is a monarchy.  The Queen performs many ceremonial duties. There is a premier and a cabinet.  Laws are passed by a parliament like in many other countries.  Many of the laws are based on how Germany rules their country. Many of these laws are written based on early Roman law.

Even though the country of the Netherlands is small, the provinces are very different.  These provinces are divided into four regions:

  • Western Netherlands commonly called Randstad has the four biggest cities and the typical Dutch countryside.
  • Northern Netherlands is popular among the locals.  This has the smallest populated areas of all of the country. There are islands and lakes in this region.
  • Eastern Netherlands is home to the largest national park of the country.  There are many medieval cities along the rivers in this province.
  • Southern Netherlands is divided by the rest of the country with its Catholic history, carnival celebrations and beer culture.
  • In addition, the Kingdom of the Netherlands owns some Caribbean Islands. Some of these islands are considered municipalities (Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba).   Other islands are considered countries (Aruba, Curacao and Sint Maarten) within the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Read More…

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Dutch Words and Phrases – Dutch Culture for kids

hat Do the Dutch Speak?

Dutch is a West Germanic language.  It is the language that 90% of the Dutch people speak in the Netherlands.  Many people in Belgium (a neighboring country in Europe) and Suriname (a country in South America) also speak Dutch. The Dutch language in Belgium is called Flemish.  Dutch is closely related to the German and English languages.  There are about twenty-five dialects of Dutch used in the Netherlands today. The second official language in the Netherlands is Friesian.  Over 500,000 people speak this language.

Common Words and Phrases

Here are some common words and phrases.  You can see that they are written in English and in Dutch.  There is also the pronunciation so you can practice speaking in Dutch.

  • Hello. Hallo. (HAH-low)
  • How are you? Hoe gaat het? (Hoo GAHT hut?)
  • Fine, thank you. Goed, dank u. (GOOT, dahnk uu.)
  • What is your name? Hoe heet u? (Hoo HAYT uu?)
  • My name is ______. Mijn naam is ______.  (Meyn NAHM is _____.)
  • Nice to meet you. Aangename kennismaking. (AHN-guh-NAH-muh KAN-nis-MAHK-ing.)
  • Please. Alstublieft. (AHL-stuu-BLEEFT.)
  • Thank you. Dank u. (DAHNK uu.)
  • You’re welcome. Graag gedaan. (GRAHG guh-DAHN.)
  • Yes. Ja. (YAH.)
  • No. Nee. (NAY.)
  • Excuse me. Mag ik even uw aandacht. (Mahg ick AYvuhn uuw ahnDAGHT.)
  • I’m sorry. Sorry. (SOHR-ree.)
  • Goodbye Tot ziens. (TOT seens.)
  • I can’t speak Dutch. Ik spreek geen Nederlands. (Ick SPRAYK gayn NAY-dur-lawnts.)
  • Do you speak English? Spreekt u Engels? (SPRAYKT uu ENG-uls?)
  • Help! Help! (HEHLP!)
  • Good morning. Goedemorgen. (GOO-duh-MORE-gun.)
  • Good afternoon. Goedemiddag (GOO-duh-MID-dahg.)
  • Good evening. Goedenavond. (Goo-duhn-AH-vunt.)
  • Good night. Goedenavond. (Goo-duhn-AH-vunt.)
  • Good night (to sleep) Slaap lekker. (SLAHP leck-uh.r)
  • I don’t understand. Ik begrijp het niet. (Ick buh-GRAYP hut neet.) 

Dutch Names

The Ten Most Popular Girls’ Names

  1. Emma
  2. Julia
  3. Sophie
  4. Lotte
  5. Isa
  6. Lisa
  7. Saar
  8. Lieke
  9. Eva
  10. Anna

The Ten Most Popular Boys’ Names

  1. Daan
  2. Shem
  3. Milan
  4. Levi
  5. Luuk
  6. Luca
  7. Jayden
  8. Thomas
  9. Stijn
  10. Jesse

Common Dutch Last Names (vd stands for van der, a common beginning of a last name)

  1. Bakker – Baker
  2. Bijl, vd – From the axe, i.e. descended from woodcutters
  3. Bos – Forest
  4. Berg, vd – From the hill
  5. Boer, de – Farmer
  6. Boor, vd – Farmer or simple person
  7. Brouwer – Brewer
  8. Buskirk, van – Literally “bush church”, or “church in the woods”
  9. Citroen – Lemon
  10. Dijkstra – From the dike
  11. Graaf, de – The count/earl
  12. Byl, vd - Americaization of “Van der Bill”
  13. Coevorden, van
  14. Dekker – Thatcher
  15. Dijk, Dyk, Dyck, Deijck, van – From the dike
  16. Fikse
  17. Fixe
  18. Groot, de – The big/great
  19. Haan, de – Rooster
  20. Hendriks – Henry’s son
  21. Hoff, van het – From the servant/garden
  22. Leeuwen, van – From Leeuwen/Leuven; Levi
  23. Janssen – John’s son
  24. Jong, de – Junior
  25. Jansen – John’s son
  26. Koning, Koningh, de - King
  27. Linden, vd – From the tree
  28. Meijer, Meyer – Bailiff or steward
  29. Meer, vd – From the lake
  30. Mesman - Knife
  31. Mulder, Molenaar – Miller
  32. Maarschalkerweerd – Keeper of marshlands
  33. Peters – Peter’s son
  34. Prins - Prince
  35. Rynsburger
  36. Smit, Smits – Smith
  37. Spaans – Spanish
  38. Spronk
  39. Visser – Fisher
  40. Vliet, van – From the water
  41. Vries, de – The Frisian
  42. Vos – Fox
  43. Westhuizen, van der
  44. Wit, de – White or blond

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Dutch Etiquette – Dutch Culture for kids

Meeting and Greeting

The handshake is a common greeting.  The Dutch smile and say the person’s name whom they are greeting while shaking hands.  If you are seated, it is polite to stand up to shake hands. If you are a good friend, you may greet each other by air kissing near the cheek three times, first on the left side, then the right, and the left side. When you leave, it is important to shake hands again.

Most Dutch only use first names with family and good friends.  Otherwise, they use the first and last name.

When you come into the waiting room at a public place like the doctor or dentist’s office, you greet everyone there by looking at the people and saying one greeting of “hello”.

Gift Giving Manners

If you are invited to dinner or to a party, it is common to bring a small wrapped gift to the host/hostess.  This might be a box of chocolates, a plant, flowers or a book.  If you give flowers, it is common to give an odd number.  Do not give 13 flowers as this is seen as unlucky.

Dining Manners

Dining is formal.  You should not sit down until you are told to.  Men wait until women all sit down first. No one eats until the host/hostess begins.  Dutch people use silverware for most foods including sandwiches. Salad is not cut.  It is folded on your fork.  The host gives the first toast.  If you are a guest, you can return the toast later in the meal.

You should take small portions and try to finish everything on your plate.  Dutch people don’t like to waste food.  When you are finished eating, put your knife and fork parallel across the right side of your plate.  If you are still eating, you can cross your knife and fork in the middle of the plate with the fork over the knife if you want to talk, rest from eating, or want a second helping.

 

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If you are eating at someone’s house, it is polite to offer to help with the dishes or to clean the table.  Being on time is very important to Dutch people. If you are invited to dinner, plan to be on time.  In the Netherlands, you should visit people after you have called them and planned a visit.  It is not polite just to drop by.

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About Dutch Culture – Dutch Culture for kids

About Dutch Culture

Dutch culture (of the Netherlands) is very diverse.  There are cultural differences within the Netherlands because of the four regions that make up this country. The regions are divided into counties, provinces and cities.  Foreigners who have come to live and work in this country have helped to broaden the Dutch culture, also.

 

The Role of the Family

Family is very important.  Families who have children usually choose to have one or two.

Most of these families have two parents working outside of the home.


Other Values

Children go to daycare during the day. Primary school for all children begins at age four in the Netherlands.  

  • Cleanliness and neatness are important.
  • Saving money, being organized and working hard are also valued.
  • They are very punctual people.  Being even five minutes late is not acceptable.
  • Dutch people like their privacy.
  • They do not boast of success or material wealth.
  • Dutch people are accepting of others.
  • They like to hear other people’s opinions and treat others with respect.
  • A good education and successful performance at school are important.  Many children go on to further education after high school.

 

 

What Images Do You Think Of?

The Netherlands and Dutch people bring to mind such things as wooden shoes, windmills and dikes.  We may think of the traditional clothing or folk tales about Hans Brinker and his silver skates.  Other pictures that remind you of the Netherlands might be fields of colorful tulips in spring time.  You might have heard about Anne Frank, the young Jewish girl who kept a diary during WW II.  This diary was later published and is known throughout the world.    

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Dutch Songs for Children

  1. Altijd is Kortjakje ziek
  2. Slaap kindje slaap
  3. Zakdoekje leggen
  4. Zeg ken jij de mosselman
  5. Hoedje van papier
  6. Ik zag twee beren
  7. Alle eendjes zwemmen in het water
  8. Berend Botje
  9. Zie ginds komt de stoomboot
  10. Schipper mag ik overvaren

1. Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Is Kortjakje goed gezond
 Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

‘s-Zondags gaat zij naar de kerk

Met een boek vol zilverwerk

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

Midden in de week wil zij niet wassen

‘s-Zondags strikt ze herendassen

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s zondags niet

‘s-Zondags als haar liefste komt

Altijd is Kortjakje ziek

Midden in de week maar ‘s-zondags niet

2. Slaap kindje slaap

Slaap, kindje, slaap

daar buiten loopt een schaap.

Een schaap met witte voetjes

dat drinkt zijn melk zo zoetjes.

Slaap, kindje, slaap

daar buiten loopt een schaap.

3. Zakdoekje leggen

Zakdoekje leggen

Niemand zeggen

Kukeleku zo kraait de haan

twee paar schoenen heb ik aan

Een van stof en een van leer

Hier leg ik mijn zakdoekje neer

Zakdoekje leggen

Niemand zeggen

Ik heb de hele nacht gewaakt

Twee paar schoenen heb ik afgemaakt

Een van stof en een van leer

Hier leg ik mijn zakdoekje neer

4. Zeg ken jij de mosselman

Zeg ken jij de mosselman,

de mosselman,

de mosselman

Zeg ken jij de mosselman,

die woont in Scheveningen

Ja ik ken de mosselman,

de mosselman,

de mosselman

Ja ik ken de mosselman,

die woont in Scheveningen

Samen kennen we de mosselman,

de mosselman,

de mosselman

Samen kennen we de mosselman,

die woont in Scheveningen

5. Hoedje van papier

Eén twee drie vier, hoedje van hoedje van.

Eén twee drie vier, hoedje van papier.

Als ‘t hoedje dan niet past,

Zet ‘t in de glazen kast.

Eén twee drie vier, hoedje van papier.

 

6. Ik zag twee beren

Ik zag twee beren

Broodjes smeren.

Oh, het was een wonder

Het was een wonder, boven wonder

Dat die beren smeren konden

Hi hi hi, ha ha

ha
Ik stond er bij en ik keek er naar

 

7. Alle eendjes zwemmen in het water

Alle eendjes zwemmen in het water

Falderalderiere

Falderalderare

Alle eendjes zwemmen in het water

Fal, fal, falderalderalderaldera

8. Berend Botje

Berend Botje ging uit varen

Met zijn scheepje naar Zuid-Laren

De weg was recht, de weg was krom

Nooit kwam Berend Botje weerom

Eén twee drie vier vijf zes zeven

Waar is Berend Botje gebleven

Hij is niet hier, hij is niet daar

Hij is naar Amerika

Amerika, Amerika

Drie maal in de rondte van je hopsa-sa

Amerika, Amerika

Drie maal in de rondte van je hopsa-sa

9. Zie ginds komt de stoomboot

Zie ginds komt de stoomboot

uit Spanje weer aan.

Hij brengt ons Sint Nicolaas
ik

zie hem al staan.

Hoe huppelt zijn paardje

het dek op en neer,

hoe waaien de wimpels

al heen en al weer.

Zijn knecht staat te lachen

en roept ons reeds toe:

Wie zoet is krijgt lekkers;

wie stout is de roe!

Oh, lieve Sint Nicolaas

kom ook eens bij mij

en rijd toch niet stilletjes

ons huisje voorbij!

10. Schipper mag ik overvaren

Schipper, mag ik overvaren.

Ja of nee?

Moet ik dan een cent betalen

Ja of nee?

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Dutch Culture for children – Fun Facts, Food, music, language and more..

Dutch Fun Facts – Holland/Netherlands

DINOLINGO The Dutch national soccer has played three finals in the world cup soccer; in 1974 (against Germany), 1978 (against Argentina) and 2010 (againstSpain), but unfortunately never won the cup. It is found to be quite remarkable that such a small nation plays a rather large role on the international soccer stage. Soccer is national number one sport: cycling number two and speed skating number three.

Amsterdam is the capitol of The Netherlands. This city is known for is tolerant ambiance. There is a historic reason for this rather loose and tolerant attitude; During the seventeen hundreds, Amsterdam was a safe haven for many refugees and other thinkers, fleeing dictator regimes throughout Europe. When these people all came together in Amsterdam, they discovered that the town accepted other perspectives. As long as you paid your tax on time, you where welcome in Amsterdam.

Dutch Verbal Communication & Dialects – Holland/Netherlands

DINOLINGO As in most European countries, in Holland it is expected to use the formal form “U” or “Uw”. You continue to use this formal address until the other person informs you that it’s okay to use the informal form “je/jij”. It is very common to address older people with the formal form and they might even continue to address you in this form because in the old days the formal address was much more commonly used.

Although the Netherlands is a relativelty small country, it has over thirty different regional dialects. The part of The Netherlands below the major rivers Rijn, Waal and Maas is historically Catholic and orientated more toward Belgium and France. Here dialects such as “Brabants”, “Limburg” and “Zeeuws” is spoken.

The part above the main rivers is more traditionally Protestant and orientated toward Scandinavia. Here dialects such as “Gronings”, “Drents” and “Achterhoeks” are spoken. “Fries” is actually an official language spoken in Friesland, a northern territory in Holland.

Dutch Children’s Games – Holland/Netherlands

DINOLINGO “Sjoelbakken”: This is a very popular Dutch shuffleboard game. Sjoelbak is loved by kids, but adults can also play it. All you need is a 6 ½-foot wooden shuffleboard table and wooden disks. Every player has three chances to get four wooden disks to pass four marked arches that are numbered from 1 to 4. The player with the highest number of points wins the game.

“Kinkkeren”: Round shiny marbles have captured the imaginations of Dutchchildren for centuries. This game of shooting marbles dates back to the Romans and is still extremely popular in the Netherlands. Dutch children have even gone as far as giving specific marbles special names. For example, a large marble is called a “giant giant bonk.” There are many varieties of marble games, however they all require players to use their marbles to “shoot” competitors’ marbles out of a large circular arena marked on the ground. The last player with untouched marbles wins the game.

Dutch Stories – Holland/Netherlands

DINOLINGO One popular Dutch story is that of Hans Brinker. Hans Brinker was a little Dutch boy that saved The Netherlands. On a lovely autumn day he was out for a stroll with his friend Liesa. They where picking flowers, then sat in the grass to eat some chocolate. It was a beautiful early fall day until the weather suddenly turned. A gigantic storm rolled in and the wind got out of control. The waves in the sea swelled and before Hans and Liesa realized it, they were pounding on the dykes. One dyke almost collapsed, but Hans quickly put his finger on the point where the dyke was about to break. In the mean time, Liesa ran to the village calling for help. Swiftly, a group of strong construction workers showed up to repair the damaged dyke. Little Hans Brinker was reconized as a hero.

Dutch Festivals and Traditions – Holland/ Netherlands

DINOLINGO ‘Sinterklaas’ is one of the main traditional holidays. Sinterklaas is a bishop, originally from Spain. Together with his friendly helper ‘colorful Peter’ he travels to The Netherlands to deliver presents to children. He does so by climbing the roofs of the houses on his strong, white horse named “schimmel”. While on the roof, colorful Peter will climb through the chimney and put presents in the kids shoes, which have been placed beside the fire place.

Another important Dutch holiday is “Koninginnedag” (or Queens day), celebrated on April 30th. People celebrate the Queens birthday by dancing, singing, eating, and drinking in the streets. Traditionally, this is also a great opportunity to sell off old, unused items that have been sitting in basements. Many city centers become enormous ‘garage sales’.

Christmas and Easter are also celebrated in Holland. There is one exception; There is a 1st and 2nd Christmas/Easter day in Holland. During Christmas, family comes together to celebrate and eat goodies. Presents are not given during Christmas as they are reserved more for Sinterklaas.

Traditional Dutch Clothing – Holland / Netherlands

DINOLINGO  Wooden shoes are the typical traditional shoe ware. They are remarkably light, comfortable, and actually very good for your feet. They are very handy and safe on a Dutch dairy farm just in case a cow might step on the farmers foot. Wearing wooden clogs protects the farmer’s toes.

In addition to being a semi-safety shoe, wooden shoes are warm. During the winter months people who where them place straw in the shoe as insulation, thus making them very warm. When the wooden shoes get worn out, they are often nailed against a barn or other building wall and used as a place to plant flowers or greenery.

Click here for Dutch traditional clothing

Click here to see Holland national flag

Dutch food – Holland / Netherlands

DINOLINGO  The number one fast food in the Netherlands is fresh cut Frenchfries served with a variety of sauces. In addition, local favorites include eel- and raw herring sandwiches, hardy deep brown bread rolls with Gouda cheese, and rich potato dishes like ‘hutspot’ and ‘boerenkool’. Hutspot is made from boiled potatoes, carrot and onions. After it is boiled, it needs to be mashed with lots of butter and a variety of cheeses. This is all served with traditional sausage and a yummy creamy mushroom gravy.
You will also find a big variety of delectable sweets like chocolate, spiced biscuits, and “stroopwafels”. Stroop wafels consist of two tiny, thinly cut waffles with a thick carmel syrup between that crystallizes the cookie into a chewy morsel. Before eating, you can place the cookie on top of a hot cup of tea or chocolate, in order to soften it a bit.

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