Category Archives: Greek Culture

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How to teach children Greek

50 WAYS TO TEACH CHILDREN GREEK

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1 Get fairy tales and storybooks in Greek on Amazon or from your local library

Children love shared reading time and regardless of language acquisition they will always remember the time they spent with you reading books.Try to find books with good illustrations. Look at the pictures with your child, point to things they already know in Greek.

As you come across new words ask the child what they think it is. If it is illustrated, have them point it out on the page.Use different voices for different characters.If your child has a favorite Greek story encourage him/her to play different characters making up the words from memory. Help your child to use his/her imagination to change the story or change the ending.

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2 Use puppets or turn your child’s favorite plush toy into a puppet that talks in Greek

Kids love puppets and puppet play is great for motor skills. You can tell much loved stories through puppet play, either using the whole body or make a puppet theatre from a box and use hand or finger puppets. Finger puppets are also fun when singing songs.

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3 Go to the zoo and call the name of the animals together in Greek

If you have any, look at some animal books together, then go to the zoo for the day. Ask your child the names of the animals he/she has learned and point out the new ones. This is a great place to add in adjectives and colours. When you come home, encourage your child to draw pictures of what he/she saw and talk about them together using Greek.

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4 Play hide and seek by counting in Greek

Hide and seek is a great game for practicing numbers. You could start with 1 to 10 and gradually increase. When your child knows them well you could count down backwards. When ‘seeking’ your child it’s a good opportunity to repeat words without it sounding repetitive.

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5 Play board games in Greek e.g.: snakes and ladders, board games, family games

Dice games are always good for counting and also simple addition. Board games played with the whole family can be a time for relaxed learning. Just playing a simple board game such as snakes and ladders teaches a young child so much more than just language. They also learn rules of play, understanding goals and of course, that family games equal FUN!

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6 Play games by using flashcard games e.g.: Go fish, memory game

Flashcards are one of your most valuable resources in teaching language to young children. With multiples of the same cards you can play well-known games such as Go Fish or the ‘memory game’.

Very small children may struggle to hold too many cards, so play games that have the child match one card to another. Match a sound with a picture, or two cards that have the same sound, or two pictures that match, any way you choose.

Lay cards out on the floor or table and have your child touch the card as you call out words/sounds. Encourage your child to be the caller and you touch the cards. Keep it playful and fun.

 

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7 Have a progress chart that tracks the words and phrases your child mastered

A simple progress chart teaches your child clear goals and kids love stickers. Let your child know when he/she is approaching a goal, make a big deal of reaching the goals, be excited to getting the stickers out. Praise him/her for their achievement with a ‘great job’, a hug or a ‘high five’ (or all three).

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8 Listen to children’s songs in Greek together or reward your child for memorizing a short one

Listen to children’s songs in the 2nd language whenever and wherever you can. Keep CDs in the car or put a CD on quietly in the background when you are doing something else. Add actions to the songs, this helps kids remember the words. If it suits your child’s personality, encourage them to ‘perform’ songs for you. You could have a special ‘song night’.

Here is a playlist of Greek children’s songs

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9 Listen to pop songs in Greek together or reward your child for memorizing a short one

Teach your child some catchy pop songs that you both like. Something with suitable lyrics and a good chorus are easiest to remember. Sing it around the house as you do other things, when your child tries to join in, model the language and encourage them to sing with you.

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10 Find cartoons in the 2nd language on Youtube or Amazon

Cartoons are a great way to engage kids in the 2nd language. Kids can figure out the story visually without worrying about not understanding every word. It’s easy to buy DVDs from Amazon in almost any language or, alternatively, look for them on YouTube. Let your child guide you to which cartoons they like best. Watch them together and you will know which language to reinforce.

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11 Have an annual/monthly goal check list

Make a checklist of goals or ideas of where you want to be with the language learning over a year. Break it down into monthly mini-goals.

It will be help you stay focused on where you are going and also a great way to look back and see how far you and your child have come.

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12 Create youtube playlists or find playlists suitable for your child’s level

YouTube is a super resource. You can create playlists of Greek teaching videos, these days people post from all over the world.

They might be short tutorials, or craft ideas you can incorporate into your language learning, or children’s songs you can sing together. Look for playlists already put together by others with the same goal.

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13 Join online support groups (forums, facebook pages, twitter lists, multicultural blog groups etc.)

Join some online groups to exchange ideas and information. Support is invaluable too. Teaching Greek can hit some hurdles, it is important to be able to connect with people who are having the same difficulties or have successfully navigated these hurdles. Facebook and Twitter are great for immediate connections. Online chat groups or forums can give you a sense of community and common goals.

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14 Visit the website of Greece’s ministry of culture

Have a look at the website and find interesting information about Greece. Read about traditional food, dances and costumes. Look at statistics such as population. Find some fun facts about the climate, holidays and customs. Talk about them with your child and follow their lead on which parts they are interested in. You can also get all this information and more here

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15 Go to public libraries and check all the available resources in Greek

Libraries are an excellent resource. If they don’t have things things in Greek ask the librarian if it is possible to order them. Also check out the noticeboard and see if there are any kids groups speaking Greek in the area. You might make some new friends too.

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16 Make use of language learning DVDs for kids

Language DVDs come handy , especially fro busy parents, as they repeat useful words and phrases in a fun and interesting way Check them out, Look for something that is specifically for kids, that uses games and songs and has well-structured levels.

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17 Play CDs when driving your child to school

Always play CDs in Greek when you are in the car. It could be songs or a kids’ language learning CD, whatever your child likes. Do it consistently so your child comes to expect the 2nd language in the car.

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18 Play streaming radio in the background at home or make use of Spotify, Lastfm, etc.

Nowadays, there are a lot of resources that help you play streaming radio through personal electronic devices and laptops, etc. All you need is tuning into one of the local radio stations and have the radio or the song list play in the background all day long. Even if your child does not understand what has been spoken or the lyrics of the songs he/she will get used to the new sounds and intonation patterns.

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19 Make use of worksheets for beginners

There are a great many websites offering worksheets for beginners. Many are free and some you can pay monthly or a yearly fee. Kids love worksheets. Some may be simple coloring sheets (kids LOVE coloring), or sheets that help fine motor skills through pencil manipulation. Buy some stickers and put one on each sheet your child completes.

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20 Make use of Flashcards

There is no end to the fun to be had from playing games with flashcards even if you child is still too young to play a game that has structure and rules. You can make your own ‘games’ call out a card, have your child touch it/pick it up. ‘Hide’ the cards around the room and have your child find them and say what they are etc.

You can also put the flashcards up around the room. Change them each week in categories (animals/flowers/ fruit/etc. Look at them and say them often with your child. Ask them, “What’s this? / What’s that?”

Put them on your fridge with magnets or let your child do this.You call out the words and have them put them on.

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21 Get a picture dictionary to get started

A Children’s picture dictionary is a wonderful resource. Follow your child’s curiosity with it. Let him/her choose what he/she wants to know on any given day. Ask him/her more information about the words they do know. “What color is it?” “ Is it big or small? “ “Where does it live?” “What does it do?”

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22 Consider getting an alphabet book

Introduce your child to the shapes of letters with a simple alphabet book. This is especially useful if the Greek alphabet is different to that of the 1st language. For young learners, get a very simple, ‘starter’ book, also great for fine motor skills and pencil control.

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23 Think about kinesthetic learning (learning by doing). Coloring books, sketchbooks or DVDs that children watch and dance are great!

The research is in that kids learn best by doing (don’t we all?).

Anything that gets kids moving their bodies or their hands helps them to learn. Watch DVDs together, make up dances, put on ‘shows’, even dress up. Encourage your child’s inner artist with a sketchbook. Color, paint, draw, and talk about the colors and your child’s pictures in the 2nd language. Coloring in pictures is a very relaxing activity (you should do it too!) Kids tend to be very relaxed when they are coloring, a good time to make some general chitchat in Greek.

Mix paints and talk in Greek about how colors are made.

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24 Consider getting a reading pen

The very latest translation tool. A ‘reading pen’ scans and translates. The translated text appears on a small screen on the pen and can also provide audio pronunciation of words or full sentences.

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25 Find some talking or singing plush toys

There are so many talking toys on the market these days. Try one that says greetings in Greek (or multiple languages) or one that sings traditional songs/nursery rhymes from Greece.

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26 Make use of culture books prepared for little kids

Ready made ‘culture books’ are great for learning about different countries. Read them together, ask questions and encourage your child to ask lots of questions too. After reading one, you could make a simple one together using pictures from magazines, or encourage your child to draw pictures too. Gather information together at the library or from the internet.

27 Decorate your child’s room with learning posters (colors, numbers) or pictures from Greece (flag, the cities, etc.)

Get some large colorful posters to decorate your child’s room or the learning space you use. Point things out and ask questions, swap roles and have your child ask the questions too, this also helps model the pronunciation. Ask which is your child’s favorite poster and why?

Follow their lead on the things that interest them.

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28 Follow a simple syllabus prepared for kids

Use the simple syllabus prepared in your language learning system or make one yourself. Let your child know what it is so he/she can see what they will be doing. Children tend to do better when they know what is coming and what is expected of them.

29 Use stickers as rewards (stickers that say congratulations, wonderful, etc. in the 2nd language)

Kids love stickers! Use them liberally. Take praising your child as an opportunity to use the 2nd language. If you can find stickers with words of praise in the 2nd language use those and repeat the words a lot. Use a couple of words at first and add more as your child knows them.

30 Get some printed items related to the 2nd language: T-shirts, mugs, children’s silverware, etc.

If you have the opportunity to visit the 2nd language country buy goods with the language on. T-shirts, mugs and pens are useful as well as educational. Look for postcards, posters or bumper stickers with popular expressions on. Post these around your house.

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31 Arrange play dates or playgroups with other parents who want to teach their children Greek.

Try to find other parents encouraging their children to learn Greek, arrange to play together, go on picnics to the park or take a trip to a zoo or aquarium, great places to practice the language. Making new friends is of great benefit to you too!

 

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32 Video chat with friends and relatives who have a child that speaks Greek

Encourage video chat with other children you know, that speak Greek. It’s easy using Skype or Google Hangouts or something similar. Be nearby to help the conversation along. Be encouraging and resist the temptation to correct your child’s mistakes.

 

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33 Invite Grandma and Grandpa (who can speak Greek) to stay over

Spending time with grandparents is valuable to all parties anyway but spending time with grandparents who speak Greek is great for strengthening bonds and hearing natural language. Your child will come to associate Greek with feelings of love and security.

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34 Hire a short-term or full time nanny or caregiver that speaks Greek

If it is possible, consider hiring a nanny/caregiver/babysitter who speaks Greek. Even a few hours per week would make a difference (and give you a little free time!).

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35 Cook Greek recipes together with your child

Kids always want to be a ‘little helper’ in the kitchen. Cook some simple dishes from Greece together. Us the 2nd language for instructions, wash, cut, wipe, mix…. Name the ingredients in a natural way as you cook. Here are some Greek recipes

36 Go to community centers, cultural centers and temples with your child

Local places of interest are stimulating for your child and cultural centers often have exhibitions or music/dance performances. Look out for anything from Greece. Community centers are a great place to meet people, look at notice boards for anything from people interested or connected in some way to, Greek. You could even offer to do something yourself, give a talk about the country or a traditional dance etc.

37 Visit Greek supermarkets and Greek restaurants with your child

Go around a Greek supermarket and point out the foods from Greece. If your child is unfamiliar with them, ask questions. “How do you think it tastes?” “ Do you think this is hard/soft/crunchy/sweet/etc.?” If possible eat in ethnic restaurants. Talk about the food, how it is prepared, where it comes from.

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38 Have a word of the day activity

Pick a ‘word of the day’, you or your child could choose it, or have your child pick it at random from a pile of word cards. If the word is a noun, look for it around the house and when you go outside. Talk about where it might be found. If it is a verb, find ways to do the action either really or mime it, see if you can spot other people doing it? Or use adverbs and spend some time doing everything in the manner of the adverb, slowly/quickly/happily/etc.

39 Play Greek online language games (memory, click&tell, etc.) with your child

There are plenty of free online interactive language games for children. Find one that appeals to your child and encourage them to do a little every day. You can check out 3 different kinds of free Greek online language learning games here

 

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40 Try Skype lessons for children (may not be advised for infants and toddlers)

Many teachers are offering language lessons via Skype. Ask around and see if anyone can recommend a teacher to you. Sit in on the lesson too so you know what language to reinforce between lessons.

 

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41 Read bedtime stories in Greek to your child

Books, books, books. Kids love books and stories. Read stories in Greek before bed. Often when kids have heard a favorite story many times they know the words. Encourage your child to help tell the story.

42 Play Greek children’s games

Many children’s games are the same the world over, play kids games your child already knows in their 1st language but play it in the 2nd language. Paper, rock, scissors has many variations; play it in the 2nd language. Hopscotch, skipping games, clapping games etc. can all be played in any language. For more ideas have a look at the games in the different ‘countries and cultures’ at Dino Lingo (to the right of this post).

43 Get comic books & children’s magazines from Greece

Ask if a friend or relative overseas can send you comics or children’s magazines in Greek. Children’s magazines usually have lots of fun facts in them that you can talk about and further research. They also have quizzes and puzzles that are lots of fun to do.

44 Go to a national parade of the target culture

You could try to find where there is a large community of people from the target culture. They will no doubt have special events to celebrate the holidays of their country of origin. Take your child to their parades and festivals.

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45 Have a personalized notebook specially used for learning the2nd language(Don’t forget to use it to have your child draw whatever you say in the 2nd language

Let your child choose the notebook at the shop and decorate it anyway they want to make it special. Say words in Greek and have them draw pictures, or even write the word or the first letter, depending on what level they are at. Go back over the pictures every few days. Talk about the pictures and praise your child’s drawing skills.

46 Do local crafts

If you are a native speaker of Greek think about the crafts you did as a child and do them with your child (think also about how happy you were doing this activity with your own mother/father or your friends). Don’t worry if you have forgotten how, look on the Internet to refresh your memory. Perhaps you could send something your child makes to grandparents or relatives overseas.

47 Use chatting apps (WhatsApp, Line, etc.) to talk with friends and family who have same-aged children

Chatting apps are mobile and easy to use. Chat with friends in the 2nd who have children about the same age. Encourage your child to chat with them and their kids too. Ask their kids about themselves, their day etc. and encourage your child to talk about themselves.

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48 Sing lullabies in the 2nd language to put your baby asleep

Lullabies are so soothing for baby and parent. Sing some Greek lullabies to help your baby sleep. You can buy wind-up crib music at a baby store. Play the music and sing in the Greek. Establish is as a routine and enjoy the time holding your baby and knowing you are soothing him/her.

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49 Consider homeschooling by getting an online curriculum

More and more people are turning to homeschooling these days and there are plenty of resources online. Do some research and find something that suits you and your child. Depending on the school hours where you live, it may be possible for your child to attend the local school and follow a homeschooling curriculum.

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50 Send your child to a summer camp where he/she can study Greek in a short time.

Summer camp is a great experience for children. It is often their first extended time away from home and a chance to make lots of new friends and try a variety of activities for the first time. ‘Language’ camps for kids usually incorporate study with lots of games/crafts/activities related to the 2nd language culture. Look online or on the notice board in community centers and other public buildings.

 

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Greek Songs for Children – Greek Culture for kids


 

1. ΑΧ ΚΟΥΝΕΛΑΚΙ

ΑΧ ΚΟΥΝΕΛΑΚΙ ΚΟΥΝΕΛΑΚΙ ΞΥΛΟ ΠΟΥ ΘΑ ΤΟ ΦΑΣ

ΜΕΣΑ ΣΕ ΞΕΝΟ ΠΕΡΙΒΟΛΑΚΙ ΤΡΥΠΕΣ ΓΙΑΤΙ ΤΡΥΠΑΣ

ΜΕΣΑ ΣΕ ΞΕΝΟ ΠΕΡΙΒΟΛΑΚΙ ΤΡΥΠΕΣ ΓΙΑΤΙ ΤΡΥΠΑΣ

ΑΧ ΚΟΥΝΕΛΑΚΙ ΚΟΥΝΕΛΑΚΙ ΞΥΛΟ ΠΟΥ ΘΑ ΤΟ ΦΑΣ

ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΣΟΥΦΡΩΝΕΙΣ ΤΗ ΜΥΤΟΥΛΑ ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΚΟΥΝΑΣ Τ’ ΑΦΤΙΑ

ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΤΟ ΚΛΕΙΝΕΙΣ ΤΟ ΜΑΤΑΚΙ ΕΙΣΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΖΩΓΡΑΦΙΑ

ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΣΟΥΦΡΩΝΕΙΣ ΤΗ ΜΥΤΟΥΛΑ ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΚΟΥΝΑΣ Τ’ΑΦΤΙΑ

ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΤΟ ΚΛΕΙΝΕΙΣ ΤΟ ΜΑΤΑΚΙ ΕΙΣΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΖΩΓΡΑΦΙΑ

ΑΧ ΚΟΥΝΕΛΑΚΙ ΚΟΥΝΕΛΑΚΙ ΞΥΛΟ ΠΟΥ ΘΑ ΤΟ ΦΑΣ

ΜΕΣΑ ΣΕ ΞΕΝΟ ΠΕΡΙΒΟΛΑΚΙ ΤΡΥΠΕΣ ΓΙΑΤΙ ΤΡΥΠΑΣ

ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΣΟΥΦΡΩΝΕΙΣ ΤΗ ΜΥΤΟΥΛΑ ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΚΟΥΝΑΣ Τ’ΑΦΤΙΑ

ΜΗ ΜΟΥ ΤΟ ΚΛΕΙΝΕΙΣ ΤΟ ΜΑΤΑΚΙ ΕΙΣΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΖΩΓΡΑΦΙΑ

ΕΙΣΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΖΩΓΡΑΦΙΑ ΕΙΣΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΖΩΓΡΑΦΙΑ

2. Birthday Song

ΝΑ ΖΗΣΕΙΣ ΜΙΚΡΕ ΜΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΧΡΟΝΙΑ ΠΟΛΛΑ

ΜΕΓΑΛΟΣ ΝΑ ΓΙΝΕΙΣ ΜΕ ΑΣΠΡΑ ΜΑΛΛΙΑ

ΠΑΝΤΟΥ ΝΑ ΣΚΟΡΠΙΖΕΙΣ ΤΗΣ ΓΝΩΣΗΣ ΤΟ ΦΩΣ

ΚΑΙ ΟΛΟΙ ΝΑ ΛΕΝΕ «ΝΑ ΕΝΑΣ ΣΟΦΟΣ»

3. ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΑΡΙΑ

ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΑΡΙΑ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΑΡΙΑ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΠΑΩ ΕΓΩ ΣΤΟΥΣ ΚΗΠΟΥΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ

ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΠΑΩ ΕΓΩ ΣΤΟΥΣ ΚΗΠΟΥΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ ΠΕΡΝΩ

ΤΙ ΘΑ ΚΑΝΕΙΣ ΜΕΣ ΣΤΟΥΣ ΚΗΠΟΥΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

ΤΙ ΘΑ ΚΑΝΕΙΣ ΜΕΣ ΣΤΟΥΣ ΚΗΠΟΥΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΚΟΨΩ ΔΥΟ ΒΙΟΛΕΤΤΕΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ

ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΚΟΨΩ ΔΥΟ ΒΙΟΛΕΤΤΕΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ ΠΕΡΝΩ

ΤΙ ΘΑ ΚΑΝΕΙΣ ΤΙΣ ΒΙΟΛΕΤΤΕΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

ΤΙ ΘΑ ΚΑΝΕΙΣ ΤΙΣ ΒΙΟΛΕΤΤΕΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

ΘΑ ΤΙΣ ΔΩΣΩ ΣΤΗΝ ΚΑΛΗ ΜΟΥ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ

ΘΑ ΤΙΣ ΔΩΣΩ ΣΤΗΝ ΚΑΛΗ ΜΟΥ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ ΠΕΡΝΩ

ΚΑΙ ΠΟΙΑ ΕΙΝΑΙ Η ΚΑΛΗ ΣΟΥ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

ΚΑΙ ΠΟΙΑ ΕΙΝΑΙ Η ΚΑΛΗ ΣΟΥ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

Η ΚΑΛΗ ΜΟΥ ΕΙΝ’Η ΜΑΙΡΗ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ

Η ΚΑΛΗ ΜΟΥ ΕΙΝ’ Η ΜΑΙΡΗ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΩ ΠΕΡΝΩ

ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΑΡΙΑ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΑΡΙΑ ΔΕΝ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ ΠΕΡΝΑΣ

4. ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΧΕΡΙΑ ΤΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΧΕΡΙΑ ΤΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ (2 TIMES)

ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΕΙΜΑΙ ΕΓΩ ΠΑΙΔΙ ΞΕΡΩ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΝΑ ΓΕΛΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΧΕΡΙΑ ΤΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΔΑΧΤΥΛΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ (2 TIMES)

ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΕΙΜΑΙ ΕΓΩ ΠΑΙΔΙ ΞΕΡΩ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΝΑ ΓΕΛΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΔΑΧΤΥΛΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΓΟΝΑΤΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ (2 TIMES)

ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΕΙΜΑΙ ΕΓΩ ΠΑΙΔΙ ΞΕΡΩ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΝΑ ΓΕΛΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΓΟΝΑΤΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΠΟΔΙΑ ΤΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ (2 TIMES)

ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΕΙΜΑΙ ΕΓΩ ΠΑΙΔΙ ΞΕΡΩ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΝΑ ΓΕΛΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΠΟΔΙΑ ΤΑ ΧΤΥΠΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΧΕΙΛΗ ΤΑ ΚΟΛΛΩ (2 TIMES)

ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΕΙΜΑΙ ΕΓΩ ΠΑΙΔΙ ΞΕΡΩ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΝΑ ΓΕΛΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΜΟΥ ΧΕΙΛΗ ΤΑ ΚΟΛΛΩ

ΧΑΡΩΠΑ ΘΕ ΝΑ ΓΕΛΑΣΩ ΔΥΝΑΤΑ (2 TIMES)

ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΕΙΜΑΙ ΕΓΩ ΠΑΙΔΙ ΞΕΡΩ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΝΑ ΓΕΛΩ

ΚΙ ΑΜΑ ΘΕΣ ΑΠ’ΤΗΝ ΑΡΧΗ ΞΑΝΑΡΧΙΝΩ

5. MIA ΩΡΑΙΑ ΠΕΤΑΛΟΥΔΑ

ΜΙΑ ΩΡΑΙΑ ΠΕΤΑΛΟΥΔΑ ΜΙΑ ΩΡΑΙΑ ΠΕΤΑΛΟΥΔΑ

ΜΙΑ ΩΡΑΙΑ ΠΕΤΑΛΟΥΔΑ Σ’ΕΝΑΝ ΚΑΜΠΟ ΜΙΑ ΦΟΡΑ

ΖΟΥΣΕ ΚΙ ΗΤΑΝ ΜΙΑ ΧΑΡΑ

ΛΑΜΠΟΥΝ ΚΟΚΚΙΝΕΣ ΠΙΤΣΙΛΕΣ, ΛΑΜΠΟΥΝ ΚΟΚΚΙΝΕΣ

ΠΙΤΣΙΛΕΣ ΛΑΜΠΟΥΝ ΚΟΚΚΙΝΕΣ ΠΙΤΣΙΛΕΣ ΣΤΑ ΓΑΛΑΖΙΑ

ΤΗΣ ΦΤΕΡΑ

ΟΛΟ ΤΟΝ ΚΑΙΡΟ ΓΥΡΙΖΕΙ ΟΛΟ ΤΟΝ ΚΑΙΡΟ ΓΥΡΙΖΕΙ

ΟΛΟ ΤΟΝ ΚΑΙΡΟ ΓΥΡΙΖΕΙ ΚΑΙ ΤΑ ΑΝΘΗ ΧΑΙΡΕΤΑ

ΟΤΑΝ ΕΡΘΕΙ Ο ΧΕΙΜΩΝΑΣ ΟΤΑΝ ΕΡΘΕΙ Ο ΧΕΙΜΩΝΑΣ

ΟΤΑΝ ΕΡΘΕΙ Ο ΧΕΙΜΩΝΑΣ ΠΕΦΤΕΙ ΚΑΤΩ ΚΑΙ ΨΟΦΑ

ΚΙ ΟΤΑΝ ΕΡΘΕΙ ΚΑΛΟΚΑΙΡΙ ΖΩΝΤΑΝΕΥΕΙ ΚΑΙ ΠΕΤΑ

6. O ΓΑΪΔΑΡΟΣ

ΗΤΑΝ ΕΝΑΣ ΓΑΪΔΑΡΟΣ ΜΕ ΜΕΓΑΛΑ ΑΥΤΙΑ

ΤΟ ΠΑΧΝΙ ΔΕΝ Τ’ ΑΡΕΣΕ, ΗΘΕΛΕ ΑΡΧΟΝΤΙΑ

ΗΘΕΛΕ Η ΜΟΥΡΗ ΤΟΥ ΝΑ ΦΟΡΕΣΕΙ ΣΕΛΑ

ΚΑΙ ΝΑ ΚΑΜΑΡΩΝΕΤΑΙ ΜΕ ΤΟ ΣΥΡΕ ΚΙ ΕΛΑ

ΣΤΟ ΔΡΟΜΟ ΠΟΥ ΕΠΗΓΑΙΝΕ ΕΙΔΕ ΜΙ’ ΑΛΕΠΟΥ

ΓΑΪΔΑΡΕ ΤΟΝ ΡΩΤΗΣΕ, ΓΑΪΔΑΡΕ ΓΙΑ ΠΟΥ,

ΓΙΑ ΠΟΥ ΓΙΑ ΠΟΥ ΓΙΑ ΠΟΥ

ΔΕ ΣΟΥ ΛΕΩ ΑΛΕΠΟΥ ΤΙ ΔΡΟΜΟ ΘΕ ΝΑ ΠΑΡΩ

ΤΗΝ ΚΑΚΗ ΤΗ ΣΚΕΨΗ ΣΟΥ ΤΗΝ ΞΕΡΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΑΡΩ

ΞΕΡΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΑΡΩ ΞΕΡΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΑΡΩ

ΗΤΑΝ ΕΝΑΣ ΓΑΪΔΑΡΟΣ ΜΕ ΜΕΓΑΛΑ ΑΥΤΙΑ

ΤΟ ΠΑΧΝΙ ΔΕΝ Τ’ ΑΡΕΣΕ, ΗΘΕΛΕ ΑΡΧΟΝΤΙΑ

ΗΘΕΛΕ Η ΜΟΥΡΗ ΤΟΥ ΝΑ ΦΟΡΕΣΕΙ ΣΕΛΑ

ΚΑΙ ΝΑ ΚΑΜΑΡΩΝΕΤΑΙ ΜΕ ΤΟ ΣΥΡΕ ΚΙ ΕΛΑ

7. O ΜΠΑΡΜΠΑ-ΜΠΡΙΛΙΟΣ

Ο ΜΠΑΡΜΠΑ-ΜΠΡΙΛΙΟΣ, Ο ΜΠΑΡΜΠΑ-ΜΠΡΙΛΙΟΣ

ΕΙΧΕ ΕΝΑ ΓΑΛΟ, ΕΙΧΕ ΕΝΑ ΓΑΛΟ

ΠΟΛΥ ΜΕΓΑΛΟ… ΠΟΛΥ ΜΕΓΑΛΟ

ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ, ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ

ΜΕΛΙ ΚΑΙ ΤΑΧΙΝΙ, ΜΕΛΙ ΚΑΙ ΤΑΧΙΝΙ

ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΤΟΝ ΠΑΧΥΝΕΙ… ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΤΟΝ ΠΑΧΥΝΕΙ

ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ, ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ

ΨΩΜΙ ΚΙ ΑΛΑΤΙ, ΨΩΜΙ ΚΙ ΑΛΑΤΙ

ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΚΑΝΕΙ ΠΛΑΤΗ… ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΚΑΝΕΙ ΠΛΑΤΗ

ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ, ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ,

ΨΩΜΙ ΓΑΡΔΟΥΜΠΑ, ΨΩΜΙ ΓΑΡΔΟΥΜΠΑ,

ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΚΑΝΕΙ ΤΟΥΜΠΑ… ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΚΑΝΕΙ ΤΟΥΜΠΑ

ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ, ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ,

ΨΩΜΙ ΜΠΟΥΓΑΤΣΑ, ΨΩΜΙ ΜΠΟΥΓΑΤΣΑ,

ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΚΑΝΕΙ ΜΠΡΑΤΣΑ, ΓΙΑ ΝΑ ΚΑΝΕΙ ΜΠΡΑΤΣΑ

ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ, ΚΑΙ ΤΟΝ ΕΤΑΙΖΕ,

ΨΩΜΙ ΚΑΙ ΧΟΡΤΑ, ΨΩΜΙ ΚΑΙ ΧΟΡΤΑ,

ΩΣΠΟΥ ΔΕ ΧΩΡΑΓΕ ΑΠΟ ΤΗΝ ΠΟΡΤΑ

ΩΣΠΟΥ ΔΕ ΧΩΡΑΓΕ ΑΠΟ ΤΗΝ ΠΟΡΤΑ

ΩΣΠΟΥ ΜΙΑ ΜΕΡΑ, ΩΣΠΟΥ ΜΙΑ ΜΕΡΑ

ΜΕ ΔΙΧΩΣ ΗΛΙΟ, ΜΕ ΔΙΧΩΣ ΗΛΙΟ

Ο ΓΑΛΟΣ ΕΦΑΓΕ … ΤΟΝ ΜΠΑΡΜΠΑ-ΜΠΡΙΛΙΟ

Ο ΓΑΛΟΣ ΕΦΑΓΕ … ΤΟΝ ΜΠΑΡΜΠΑ-ΜΠΡΙΛΙΟ

8. ΟΙ 9 ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ

ΣΕ ΜΙΑ ΚΥΨΕΛΗ ΖΟΥΣΑΝΕ ΕΝΝΕΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ

ΠΟΥ ΗΤΑΝΕ ΚΑΛΕΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΑΚΤΙΚΕΣ ΝΟΙΚΟΚΥΡΟΥΛΕΣ

ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΔΥΟ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΕΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΠΕΝΤΕ ΚΑΙ

ΕΞΗ ΚΙ ΕΦΤΑ ΚΙ ΟΧΤΩ ΚΙ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

ΟΛΗ ΤΗΝ ΜΕΡΑ ΔΟΥΛΕΥΑΝ ΟΙ ΕΝΝΕΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ

ΜΕΛΑΚΙ ΦΤΙΑΧΝΑΝΕ ΓΛΥΚΟ ΜΕΣ ΣΤΙΣ ΜΙΚΡΕΣ ΤΡΥΠΟΥΛΕΣ

ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΔΥΟ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΕΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΠΕΝΤΕ ΚΑΙ

ΕΞΗ ΚΙ ΕΦΤΑ ΚΙ ΟΧΤΩ ΚΙ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

8 ΚΑΙ 1 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9 – 7 ΚΑΙ 2 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9 6 ΚΑΙ 3 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9

5 ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΑ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

ΜΙΑ ΑΡΚΟΥΔΙΤΣΑ ΕΙΔΕ ΤΙΣ ΕΝΝΕΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ

ΚΙ ΟΙ ΑΡΚΟΥΔΙΤΣΕΣ ΞΕΡΕΤΕ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΠΟΛΥ ΛΙΧΟΥΔΕΣ

ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΔΥΟ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΕΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΠΕΝΤΕ ΚΑΙ

ΕΞΗ ΚΙ ΕΦΤΑ ΚΙ ΟΧΤΩ ΚΙ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

Η ΑΡΚΟΥΔΙΤΣΑ ΕΦΑΓΕ ΤΟ ΜΕΛΙ ΑΠ’ΤΗΝ ΚΗΡΥΘΡΑ

ΚΙ ΟΙ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΘΥΜΩΣΑΝ ΠΑΡΑ ΠΟΛΥ ΣΤ’ ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ

ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΔΥΟ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΕΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΠΕΝΤΕ ΚΑΙ

ΕΞΗ ΚΙ ΕΦΤΑ ΚΙ ΟΧΤΩ ΚΙ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

ΚΥΝΗΓΙ ΑΡΧΙΣΕ ΤΡΕΛΟ ΜΕΣ ΣΤΟ ΜΕΓΑΛΟ ΔΑΣΟΣ

ΚΙ Η ΑΡΚΟΥΔΙΤΣΑ ΦΩΝΑΞΕ «ΣΥΓΝΩΜΗ ΕΚΑΝΑ ΛΑΘΟΣ»

ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΔΥΟ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΕΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΠΕΝΤΕ ΚΑΙ

ΕΞΗ ΚΙ ΕΦΤΑ ΚΙ ΟΧΤΩ ΚΙ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

ΟΙ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ Τ’ ΑΚΟΥΣΑΝ ΚΑΙ ΧΑΡΗΚΑΝ ΠΟΛΥ

ΜΕ ΤΗΝ ΑΡΚΟΥΔΑ ΕΓΙΝΑΝ ΦΙΛΟΙ ΚΟΛΛΗΤΟΙ

ΚΑΙ ΜΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΔΥΟ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΕΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΠΕΝΤΕ ΚΑΙ

ΕΞΗ ΚΙ ΕΦΤΑ ΚΙ ΟΧΤΩ ΚΙ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

8 ΚΑΙ 1 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9 – 7 ΚΑΙ 2 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9 6 ΚΑΙ 3 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9

5 ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΑ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

8 ΚΑΙ 1 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9 – 7 ΚΑΙ 2 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9 6 ΚΑΙ 3 ΚΑΝΕΙ 9

5 ΚΑΙ ΤΕΣΣΕΡΑ ΕΝΝΙΑ ΜΕΛΙΣΣΟΥΛΕΣ ΑΓΚΑΛΙΑ

9. ΠΛΑΘΩ ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ

ΜΕ ΤΑ ΔΥΟ ΧΕΡΑΚΙΑ

ΠΛΑΘΩ ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ

ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ

Ο ΦΟΥΡΝΟΣ ΘΑ ΤΑ ΨΗΣΕΙ

ΤΟ ΣΠΙΤΙ ΘΑ ΜΥΡΙΣΕΙ

ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ

ΕΙΝ’ ΓΛΥΚΑ ΚΙ ΑΦΡΑΤΑ

ΚΙ ΟΛΟ ΜΥΡΩΔΑΤΑ

ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ

ΓΙ’ ΑΥΤΟ ΚΑΙ ΣΤΟ ΣΧΟΛΕΙΟ ΤΟΥΣ

ΤΑ ΠΑΙΡΝΟΥΝ ΤΑ ΠΑΙΔΑΚΙΑ

ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΑΚΙΑ

10. ΤΟ ΚΟΚΟΡΑΚΙ

ΟΤΑΝ ΘΑ ΠΑΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΟΥ ΣΤΟ ΠΑΖΑΡΙ

ΘΑ ΣΟΥ ΑΓΟΡΑΣΩ ΕΝΑ ΚΟΚΟΡΑΚΙ

ΤΟ ΚΟΚΟΡΑΚΙ ΚΙΚΙΡΙΚΙΚΙ

ΝΑ ΣΕ ΞΥΠΝΑΕΙ ΚΑΘΕ ΠΡΩΙ

ΟΤΑΝ ΘΑ ΠΑΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΟΥ ΣΤΟ ΠΑΖΑΡΙ

ΘΑ ΣΟΥ ΑΓΟΡΑΣΩ ΜΙΑ ΚΟΤΟΥΛΑ

Η ΚΟΤΟΥΛΑ ΚΟΚΟΚΟ

ΤΟ ΚΟΚΟΡΑΚΙ ΚΙΚΙΡΙΚΙΚΙ

ΝΑ ΣΕ ΞΥΠΝΑΕΙ ΚΑΘΕ ΠΡΩΙ

ΟΤΑΝ ΘΑ ΠΑΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΟΥ ΣΤΟ ΠΑΖΑΡΙ

ΘΑ ΣΟΥ ΑΓΟΡΑΣΩ ΜΙΑ ΓΑΤΟΥΛΑ

Η ΓΑΤΟΥΛΑ ΝΙΑΟΥ

Η ΚΟΤΟΥΛΑ ΚΟΚΟΚΟ

ΤΟ ΚΟΚΟΡΑΚΙ ΚΙΚΙΡΙΚΙΚΙ

ΝΑ ΣΕ ΞΥΠΝΑΕΙ ΚΑΘΕ ΠΡΩΙ

ΟΤΑΝ ΘΑ ΠΑΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΟΥ ΣΤΟ ΠΑΖΑΡΙ

ΘΑ ΣΟΥ ΑΓΟΡΑΣΩ ΕΝΑ ΠΟΥΛΑΚΙ

ΤΟ ΠΟΥΛΑΚΙ ΤΣΙΟΥ ΤΣΙΟΥ

Η ΓΑΤΟΥΛΑ ΝΙΑΟΥ

Η ΚΟΤΟΥΛΑ ΚΟΚΟΚΟ

ΤΟ ΚΟΚΟΡΑΚΙ ΚΙΚΙΡΙΚΙΚΙ

ΝΑ ΣΕ ΞΥΠΝΑΕΙ ΚΑΘΕ ΠΡΩΙ

ΟΤΑΝ ΘΑ ΠΑΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΟΥ ΣΤΟ ΠΑΖΑΡΙ

ΘΑ ΣΟΥ ΑΓΟΡΑΣΩ ΕΝΑ ΓΟΥΡΟΥΝΑΚΙ

ΤΟ ΓΟΥΡΟΥΝΙ ΓΡΟΥ ΓΡΟΥ

ΤΟ ΠΟΥΛΑΚΙ ΤΣΙΟΥ ΤΣΙΟΥ

Η ΓΑΤΟΥΛΑ ΝΙΑΟΥ

Η ΚΟΤΟΥΛΑ ΚΟΚΟΚΟ

ΤΟ ΚΟΚΟΡΑΚΙ ΚΙΚΙΡΙΚΙΚΙ

ΝΑ ΣΕ ΞΥΠΝΑΕΙ ΚΑΘΕ ΠΡΩΙ

ΟΤΑΝ ΘΑ ΠΑΩ ΚΥΡΑ ΜΟΥ ΣΤΟ ΠΑΖΑΡΙ

ΘΑ ΣΟΥ ΑΓΟΡΑΣΩ ΕΝΑ ΣΚΥΛΑΚΙ

ΤΟ ΣΚΥΛΑΚΙ ΓΑΒ ΓΑΒ

ΤΟ ΓΟΥΡΟΥΝΙ ΓΡΟΥ ΓΡΟΥ

ΤΟ ΠΟΥΛΑΚΙ ΤΣΙΟΥ ΤΣΙΟΥ

Η ΓΑΤΟΥΛΑ ΝΙΑΟΥ

Η ΚΟΤΟΥΛΑ ΚΟΚΟΚΟ

ΤΟ ΚΟΚΟΡΑΚΙ ΚΙΚΙΡΙΚΙΚΙ

ΝΑ ΣΕ ΞΥΠΝΑΕΙ ΚΑΘΕ ΠΡΩΙ

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Greek Travel Destinations – Greek Culture for kids

The ParthenonGreece is famous for its many important archaeological sites and ancient monuments. It is a small country with a total population of about 10 million people.

The most popular tourist site in Athens is The Parthenon.  The Parthenon is a temple to Athena, the goddess of wisdom and warfare, built in 438 B.C.  It is located on a hill called the Acropolis in the center of the city of Athens.  Athens is the capital and largest city in Greece of about 4.5 million people. Athens is one of the world’s oldest cities dating back about 3,400 years. The city is about 159 square miles (412 km²).

MeteroraMeterora is famous for the six monasteries that sit atop tall spires of rock.  Monks lived away from people so they could have more time devoted to prayer and meditation.

Delphi is a famous archaeological site in Greece.  Ancient Greeks worshiped Apollo here.  Delphi is home to the Oracle of Delphi.  There is a museum that houses many statues of long ago.

Corinth at one time was a very wealthy town.  It was destroyed 2,000 years ago by the Romans.  It is mostly a Roman archaeological site.

Monemvasia is a walled city on the sea in the south-eastern Peloponnese.  Stone walkways, small houses and lots of restaurants and shops add to the city’s charm.  You can see the city walls and the old church.

Cyclades Islands

Cyclades Islands

  • Crete, the largest of the Greek Islands has archaeological digs related to the Minoan civilization.  There is King Minos’ Palace that was built four thousand years ago!

  • Naxos is thought to be the most beautiful of Greek islands.  It has beaches and the sea to explore.

  • Santorini has many villages on steep cliffs overlooking the water.  These cliffs are the remains of a large volcano that erupted, collapses and then flooded the area a long time ago.  Fira, the island’s capital has houses painted white and blue-domed churches, winding lanes.

  • Mykonos is known as the Gateway to Delors, a small island known as the birthplace of Apollo and his twin Artemis.  There are many archaeological ruins to explore.

Dodecanese Islands

  • Rhodes is a walled town created by the Knights of Saint John.  You can visit Lindos and see the hilltop ruins of the Temple of Athena and view the Aegean Sea.  Rhodes was once home of the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Ionian Islands

  • Kerkyra (Corfu) is the closest Greek Island to Europe.  It has lots of luxurious vegetation.  Corfu Town is known for its nightlife.

Sporades Islands

Sporades Islands

  • Skopelos is located in the central Aegean Sea.  It is close to the mainland.  This island is known as the “greenest” of the Greek Islands.  Many of the scenes from the film Mama Mia were shot here as well as on the neighboring island of Skiathos. The small chapel at Skopelos featured in the movie allows Greek Orthodox weddings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

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Greek Traditional Music and Instruments – Greek Culture for kids

Greek DanceGreek music and dance have a very long history.  In ancient Greece, music was performed to accompany poetry or plays.  Some Greek folk dance rhythms are taken from the poetic metre from ancient dramas.  During Christian times and up until the present,  instrumental music, dance and song have been important parts in special events and holidays like baptisms, saints’ days, engagements, weddings, and harvest festival, Easter and May Day.  Wherever Greek people gather, there is music and songs.

Many Greek dances are done in large groups at big community celebrations. Dances are done in circles or in lines. There are over 4,000 traditional Greek dances!

Traditional instruments from Greece include the plucked stringed instrument called a bouzouki from the lute family, a kind of bagpipe known as a gaida made of sheep or goat hide, and toumbi a kind of large double-headed drum played with sticks.Gaida

Greek Children’s Songs (click on the link to hear a Greek children’s song)

Greek people love singing and passing on their culture to children. Popular children’s songs include:

Αδελφος Ιακωβος

Brother James

Καλήν εσπέραν άρχοντες

Christmas Carol

Παλαμάκια παίξετε

Clap Your Hands

Έλα ύπνε μου, πάρε το

Come, Good Sleep

Έλα ύπνε μου κ’έλα ‘Γειά

Come, Sleep, Come, Health

Βρε καλό, στο καλό να ‘χη

Ho, Hail and He May Prosper

Νάνι του ρήγα το παιδί

Hush, Son of the King

Βρέχει, χιονίζει

It’s Raining, It’s Snowing

‘Εχω γυιό και έχω χαρά

I’ve a Son and I’m Glad

Κουνελακι

Little Rabbit

Μην κάνετε κανένα θόρυβο

Make No Noise

Φεγγαράκι μου λαμπρό

My Little Shining Moon

Το παιδάκι μου το ρούσσο

My Rosy Child

Βρέξε βρέξε Παναγιά μου

Rain, Rain, Dear Virgin

Κοιμήσου

Sleep

Κοιμήσου, χαδεμένο μου

Sleep, My Darling

Ο ύπνος τρέφει τα μωρά

Sleep Nurtures Babies

Κούνια – μπέλα

Swing, (My) Pretty

Να μου το πάρης, Ύπνε μου

Take Him in Charge, Kind Sleep

Το παιδί θέλει χορό

The Child Wants to Dance

Κοιμάτ’ο κούκκος στα βουνά κ’ η πέρδικα στα δάση

The Cuckoo Sleeps

Να χορέψη θέλ’ η κόρη (η θε τ’αγόρι)

The Girl (or Boy) Wants to Dance0

The Rose is Sleeping Beside the Marjoram

Τρίφι-τριφινίτσα

Triphi-triphinitsa

Ένα νερό, κυρά Βαγγελιώ

Water, Lady Vangeline

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Common Greek Surnames – Greek Culture for kids

Throughout history, ancient Greeks did not have official last names, but they did have some patronymic characteristics (i.e., Achilles was Achilles Pileidis from his father Pileas).

“Patronymics” means that Greek surnames usually come from the first name of the father of the family. So if someone’s last name is Demetriou, that means that the surname came from a man named Demetrios.

The matronymic names refer to those that cane from the mothers’ name, the national or toponymic names refer to surnames created by names of towns or districts. There are also Greek surnames referring to a profession, or the paronymic ones, referring to different abilities, or even animals.

Until a few years ago, women took their husband’s surname. Eventually, they were able to keep both surnames. Today, they are free to choose whether they want to keep their surname or add the one of their husband.

Some of the most common Greek surnames you can find include Papadopoulos, Papadakis, Ioannou, Georgiou and Demetriou.

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Greek Common Names – Greek Culture for kids

Greek children do not celebrate birthdays instead they celebrate their “name day”.  Their name day is the day of the Greek Orthodox saint they were named after.   Traditionally, the eldest child in a Greek family is named for one of their grandparents.

Popular Girls’ Names

  1. Maria

  2. Eleni

  3. Aikaterini

  4. Katerina

  5. Vasiliki

  6. Basiliki

  7. Sophia

  8. Angeliki

  9. Georgia

  10. Dimitra

Popular Boys’ Names

  1. Georgios

  2. Konstantinos

  3. Dimitrios

  4. Ioannis

  5. Nikolaos

  6. Panagiotis

  7. Christos

  8. Vasileios

  9. Athanasios

  10. Evangelos

 

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Greek Common Words and Phrases – Greek Culture for kids

People At Work

The Greek language dates back to the 15th century B.C.  It has 24 letters and is written in lower and upper case.  Today, it is the official language of Greece and Cyprus and one of the 23 official languages of the European Union. The language is spoken by at least 25 million people as their first or second language in Greece, Cyprus, and parts of the world.

Some common words and phrases in the Greek language include:

Welcome  Kalos Ilthes (or Kalos Orises)
Hello Yia or Yia sou
How are you? Ti kaneis? (Ti kanis?)
Fine, thank you Kala, efkharisto
Please Parakalo
What is your name? Pos se lene?
My name is… Me lene…
Where are you from? Apo pou ise?
I am from… Ime apo…
Nice meeting you Kharika gia ti gnorimia
Good Morning Kalimera
Good Night Kalinihta
Good Afternoon Kalo Apogevma
Good Evening Kalispera (Kalo vradi)
Goodbye Andio
Thank you Efkharisto
You are welcome Parakalo
Sorry Sighnomi
Excuse me Me singhoris
Bon Appetite Kali orexi

Many English, French, German words have Greek roots. Over fifty thousand English words are derived from the Greek language alone. These words are often used in the sciences and in medicine.   Some of these words you will be sure to recognize!

alphabet: alphavitos
Catholic: Catholicos
democracy: dimokratia
fantasy: fantasia
harmony: harmonia
idea: idea
kilo: kilo
logic: logici
museum: mousio
philosophy: philosophia
rhythm: rythmos
therapy: therapia
zodiac: zodiacos

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Greek Fashion – Greek Culture for kids

Ancient GreeksMuch of today’s fashionable clothing was once simple clothing worn by ancient Greeks. In Ancient Greece people wore outfits made from one piece of fabric with holes cut out for the head called the peplos and chiton. The peplos was sleeveless and the chiton covered part of the arms. In colder weather, people could wear a cloak called a himation on top.

Drapes were worn by both men and women in ancient Greece. Fastened with pins and brooches, the drapes looked elegant. However, in Greece today, drapes are designed only for women. One shoulder drapes are very popular, too.

Gladiator SandalsGladiator sandals were the official footwear of the gladiators who fought in the coliseum. Today, these sandals are available in a variety of colors, sizes and styles for both men and women. Jewelry is designed with motifs of the Greek Mythology such as gods and goddesses just like long ago. Both semi-precious and precious stones are used. Flowered and jeweled headbands are also worn.

So it is little wonder that the ancient clothing of drapes, tunics, cloaks, jewelry and sandals are still a part of the clothing fashion in Greece today.

Today, the traditional Greek folk costumes vary in the different regions throughout the mainland of Greece and the surrounding islands. Many traditional outfits for men on mainland Greece feature a kind of skirt called a foustanella. On the Greek islands, a traditional men’s outfit is baggy pants called vraka worn with a white shirt, a sleeveless coat, a sash, a jacket and a tasseled hat. Most traditional women’s outfits in Greece are made up of simple cotton dress with a sleeveless wool vest over it. Women added colorful aprons, sashes and head scarves to their outfits.

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Greek Fun Facts – Greek Culture for kids

Greek Culture

Greek Flag

Greece is one of the oldest cultures in Europe.  Ancient Greek culture has had a strong influence on the government, the arts and ideas for the western world.

The Greeks had the first democracy in the world.

They were the first people to have an alphabet.  In fact the word “alphabet” comes from the first two letters of the Greek alphabet:  alpha and beta.  Today, the English letters of A, B, E and O come from the Greek alphabet.

Olympic GamesThe Olympic Games started in ancient Greece.  They were held every four years in honor of Zeus, the king god.  Today we celebrate the Olympic Games with similar traditions of the early Greeks.  We use olive leaf crowns for the opening and closing ceremonies.

Ancient Greeks understood mathematics.  They discovered many geometry formulas. Greece also was home to many famous scientists. Eratosthenes calculated the circumference of the earth. Aristarchus discovered that the earth revolved around the sun instead of the other way around. More famous Greek scientists include Archimedes who was able to explain levers and pulleys and Hipparchus who created a system to explain how all the planets and stars move.

Geometry FormulasWe use Greek-style architecture today.  Pillars are used many public buildings such as churches, libraries and government buildings.

The Greek gods were said to live on Mt. Olympus, the highest point in Greece.  The most important god in Greek mythology was Zeus, the god of the sky and ruler of the gods.  Early mythology came from Greece.

Aesop's fablesAesop’s fables are famous stories about animals that talk.  These stories end with a moral, a lesson that teaches you something.  These fables are believed to be written by a Greek slave named Aesop, around 600 B.C.

Most people in Greece are part of the Greek Orthodox Christian Church.   Easter is a very important holiday in Greece.   It is a bigger holiday than Christmas.  Traditionally, Greek Easter eggs are dyed bright red.  Tsougrisma is a traditional game children in Greece play with Easter eggs.   Each child holds an egg and tries to break someone else’s egg.  The last unbroken egg is considered lucky.

MoussakaSome traditional Greek dishes are avgolimono, an egg and lemon soup, moussaka, a dish made of eggplant and meat, and baklava, a dessert made of nuts, honey and thin layers of pastry.  Because so much of Greece is along the coast there is a lot of fish and seafood in traditional Greek dishes.  Olives and olive oil are a very important part of traditional Greek food.

The flag of Greece is blue and white and was officially adopted on December 22, 1978.  It has nine horizontal blue and white stripes.  There is a white cross on a blue square field in the upper left corner.  The cross stands for Greek Orthodoxy, the main religion of Greece.  The blue and white colors stand for the seas that surround Greece.

The government of Greece is a parliamentary democracy. The people elect 300 parliamentary deputies who form the parliament.  The parliament handles making the laws. There is a Prime Minister who selects people to become cabinet ministers. The President is not elected by the people, but by the parliamentary deputies for a five year term.

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