How to teach children Russian

50 WAYS TO TEACH CHILDREN RUSSIAN

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1 Get fairy tales and storybooks in Russian on Amazon or from your local library

Children love shared reading time and regardless of language acquisition they will always remember the time they spent with you reading books.Try to find books with good illustrations. Look at the pictures with your child, point to things they already know in Russian.

As you come across new words ask the child what they think it is. If it is illustrated, have them point it out on the page.Use different voices for different characters.If your child has a favorite Russian story encourage him/her to play different characters making up the words from memory. Help your child to use his/her imagination to change the story or change the ending.

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2 Use puppets or turn your child’s favorite plush toy into a puppet that talks in Russian

Kids love puppets and puppet play is great for motor skills. You can tell much loved stories through puppet play, either using the whole body or make a puppet theatre from a box and use hand or finger puppets. Finger puppets are also fun when singing songs.

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3 Go to the zoo and call the name of the animals together in Russian

If you have any, look at some animal books together, then go to the zoo for the day. Ask your child the names of the animals he/she has learned and point out the new ones. This is a great place to add in adjectives and colours. When you come home, encourage your child to draw pictures of what he/she saw and talk about them together using Russian.

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4 Play hide and seek by counting in Russian

Hide and seek is a great game for practicing numbers. You could start with 1 to 10 and gradually increase. When your child knows them well you could count down backwards. When ‘seeking’ your child it’s a good opportunity to repeat words without it sounding repetitive.

russian alphabet, russian phonics, learn russian, russian language,board game

5 Play board games in Russian e.g.: snakes and ladders, board games, family games

Dice games are always good for counting and also simple addition. Board games played with the whole family can be a time for relaxed learning. Just playing a simple board game such as snakes and ladders teaches a young child so much more than just language. They also learn rules of play, understanding goals and of course, that family games equal FUN!

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6 Play games by using flashcard games e.g.: Go fish, memory game

Flashcards are one of your most valuable resources in teaching language to young children. With multiples of the same cards you can play well-known games such as Go Fish or the ‘memory game’.

Very small children may struggle to hold too many cards, so play games that have the child match one card to another. Match a sound with a picture, or two cards that have the same sound, or two pictures that match, any way you choose.

Lay cards out on the floor or table and have your child touch the card as you call out words/sounds. Encourage your child to be the caller and you touch the cards. Keep it playful and fun.

 

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7 Have a progress chart that tracks the words and phrases your child mastered

A simple progress chart teaches your child clear goals and kids love stickers. Let your child know when he/she is approaching a goal, make a big deal of reaching the goals, be excited to getting the stickers out. Praise him/her for their achievement with a ‘great job’, a hug or a ‘high five’ (or all three).

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8 Listen to children’s songs in Russian together or reward your child for memorizing a short one

Listen to children’s songs in the 2nd language whenever and wherever you can. Keep CDs in the car or put a CD on quietly in the background when you are doing something else. Add actions to the songs, this helps kids remember the words. If it suits your child’s personality, encourage them to ‘perform’ songs for you. You could have a special ‘song night’.

Here is a playlist of Russian children’s songs

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9 Listen to pop songs in Russian together or reward your child for memorizing a short one

Teach your child some catchy pop songs that you both like. Something with suitable lyrics and a good chorus are easiest to remember. Sing it around the house as you do other things, when your child tries to join in, model the language and encourage them to sing with you.

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10 Find cartoons in the 2nd language on Youtube or Amazon

Cartoons are a great way to engage kids in the 2nd language. Kids can figure out the story visually without worrying about not understanding every word. It’s easy to buy DVDs from Amazon in almost any language or, alternatively, look for them on YouTube. Let your child guide you to which cartoons they like best. Watch them together and you will know which language to reinforce.

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11 Have an annual/monthly goal check list

Make a checklist of goals or ideas of where you want to be with the language learning over a year. Break it down into monthly mini-goals.

It will be help you stay focused on where you are going and also a great way to look back and see how far you and your child have come.

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12 Create youtube playlists or find playlists suitable for your child’s level

YouTube is a super resource. You can create playlists of Russian teaching videos, these days people post from all over the world.

They might be short tutorials, or craft ideas you can incorporate into your language learning, or children’s songs you can sing together. Look for playlists already put together by others with the same goal.

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13 Join online support groups (forums, facebook pages, twitter lists, multicultural blog groups etc.)

Join some online groups to exchange ideas and information. Support is invaluable too. Teaching Russian can hit some hurdles, it is important to be able to connect with people who are having the same difficulties or have successfully navigated these hurdles. Facebook and Twitter are great for immediate connections. Online chat groups or forums can give you a sense of community and common goals.

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14 Visit the website of Russia’s ministry of culture

Have a look at the website and find interesting information about Russia. Read about traditional food, dances and costumes. Look at statistics such as population. Find some fun facts about the climate, holidays and customs. Talk about them with your child and follow their lead on which parts they are interested in. You can also get all this information and more here

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15 Go to public libraries and check all the available resources in Russian

Libraries are an excellent resource. If they don’t have things things in Russian ask the librarian if it is possible to order them. Also check out the noticeboard and see if there are any kids groups speaking Russian in the area. You might make some new friends too.

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16 Make use of language learning DVDs for kids

Language DVDs come handy , especially fro busy parents, as they repeat useful words and phrases in a fun and interesting way Check them out, Look for something that is specifically for kids, that uses games and songs and has well-structured levels.

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17 Play CDs when driving your child to school

Always play CDs in Russian when you are in the car. It could be songs or a kids’ language learning CD, whatever your child likes. Do it consistently so your child comes to expect the 2nd language in the car.

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18 Play streaming radio in the background at home or make use of Spotify, Lastfm, etc.

Nowadays, there are a lot of resources that help you play streaming radio through personal electronic devices and laptops, etc. All you need is tuning into one of the local radio stations and have the radio or the song list play in the background all day long. Even if your child does not understand what has been spoken or the lyrics of the songs he/she will get used to the new sounds and intonation patterns.

http://dinolingo.com/blog/Blog-Pictures/Alphabet-Book/Russian/alp_book_Russian_05_12.jpg

19 Make use of worksheets for beginners

There are a great many websites offering worksheets for beginners. Many are free and some you can pay monthly or a yearly fee. Kids love worksheets. Some may be simple coloring sheets (kids LOVE coloring), or sheets that help fine motor skills through pencil manipulation. Buy some stickers and put one on each sheet your child completes.

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20 Make use of Flashcards

There is no end to the fun to be had from playing games with flashcards even if you child is still too young to play a game that has structure and rules. You can make your own ‘games’ call out a card, have your child touch it/pick it up. ‘Hide’ the cards around the room and have your child find them and say what they are etc.

You can also put the flashcards up around the room. Change them each week in categories (animals/flowers/ fruit/etc. Look at them and say them often with your child. Ask them, “What’s this? / What’s that?”

Put them on your fridge with magnets or let your child do this.You call out the words and have them put them on.

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21 Get a picture dictionary to get started

A Children’s picture dictionary is a wonderful resource. Follow your child’s curiosity with it. Let him/her choose what he/she wants to know on any given day. Ask him/her more information about the words they do know. “What color is it?” “ Is it big or small? “ “Where does it live?” “What does it do?”

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22 Consider getting an alphabet book

Introduce your child to the shapes of letters with a simple alphabet book. This is especially useful if the Russian alphabet is different to that of the 1st language. For young learners, get a very simple, ‘starter’ book, also great for fine motor skills and pencil control.

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23 Think about kinesthetic learning (learning by doing). Coloring books, sketchbooks or DVDs that children watch and dance are great!

The research is in that kids learn best by doing (don’t we all?).

Anything that gets kids moving their bodies or their hands helps them to learn. Watch DVDs together, make up dances, put on ‘shows’, even dress up. Encourage your child’s inner artist with a sketchbook. Color, paint, draw, and talk about the colors and your child’s pictures in the 2nd language. Coloring in pictures is a very relaxing activity (you should do it too!) Kids tend to be very relaxed when they are coloring, a good time to make some general chitchat in Russian.

Mix paints and talk in Russian about how colors are made.

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24 Consider getting a reading pen

The very latest translation tool. A ‘reading pen’ scans and translates. The translated text appears on a small screen on the pen and can also provide audio pronunciation of words or full sentences.

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25 Find some talking or singing plush toys

There are so many talking toys on the market these days. Try one that says greetings in Russian (or multiple languages) or one that sings traditional songs/nursery rhymes from Russia.

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26 Make use of culture books prepared for little kids

Ready made ‘culture books’ are great for learning about different countries. Read them together, ask questions and encourage your child to ask lots of questions too. After reading one, you could make a simple one together using pictures from magazines, or encourage your child to draw pictures too. Gather information together at the library or from the internet.

27 Decorate your child’s room with learning posters (colors, numbers) or pictures from Russia (flag, the cities, etc.)

Get some large colorful posters to decorate your child’s room or the learning space you use. Point things out and ask questions, swap roles and have your child ask the questions too, this also helps model the pronunciation. Ask which is your child’s favorite poster and why?

Follow their lead on the things that interest them.

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28 Follow a simple syllabus prepared for kids

Use the simple syllabus prepared in your language learning system or make one yourself. Let your child know what it is so he/she can see what they will be doing. Children tend to do better when they know what is coming and what is expected of them.

29 Use stickers as rewards (stickers that say congratulations, wonderful, etc. in the 2nd language)

Kids love stickers! Use them liberally. Take praising your child as an opportunity to use the 2nd language. If you can find stickers with words of praise in the 2nd language use those and repeat the words a lot. Use a couple of words at first and add more as your child knows them.

30 Get some printed items related to the 2nd language: T-shirts, mugs, children’s silverware, etc.

If you have the opportunity to visit the 2nd language country buy goods with the language on. T-shirts, mugs and pens are useful as well as educational. Look for postcards, posters or bumper stickers with popular expressions on. Post these around your house.

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31 Arrange play dates or playgroups with other parents who want to teach their children Russian.

Try to find other parents encouraging their children to learn Russian, arrange to play together, go on picnics to the park or take a trip to a zoo or aquarium, great places to practice the language. Making new friends is of great benefit to you too!

 

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32 Video chat with friends and relatives who have a child that speaks Russian

Encourage video chat with other children you know, that speak Russian. It’s easy using Skype or Google Hangouts or something similar. Be nearby to help the conversation along. Be encouraging and resist the temptation to correct your child’s mistakes.

 

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33 Invite Grandma and Grandpa (who can speak Russian) to stay over

Spending time with grandparents is valuable to all parties anyway but spending time with grandparents who speak Russian is great for strengthening bonds and hearing natural language. Your child will come to associate Russian with feelings of love and security.

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34 Hire a short-term or full time nanny or caregiver that speaks Russian

If it is possible, consider hiring a nanny/caregiver/babysitter who speaks Russian. Even a few hours per week would make a difference (and give you a little free time!).

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35 Cook Russian recipes together with your child

Kids always want to be a ‘little helper’ in the kitchen. Cook some simple dishes from Russia together. Us the 2nd language for instructions, wash, cut, wipe, mix…. Name the ingredients in a natural way as you cook. Here are some Russian recipes

36 Go to community centers, cultural centers and temples with your child

Local places of interest are stimulating for your child and cultural centers often have exhibitions or music/dance performances. Look out for anything from Russia. Community centers are a great place to meet people, look at notice boards for anything from people interested or connected in some way to, Russian. You could even offer to do something yourself, give a talk about the country or a traditional dance etc.

37 Visit Russian supermarkets and Russian restaurants with your child

Go around a Russian supermarket and point out the foods from Russia. If your child is unfamiliar with them, ask questions. “How do you think it tastes?” “ Do you think this is hard/soft/crunchy/sweet/etc.?” If possible eat in ethnic restaurants. Talk about the food, how it is prepared, where it comes from.

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38 Have a word of the day activity

Pick a ‘word of the day’, you or your child could choose it, or have your child pick it at random from a pile of word cards. If the word is a noun, look for it around the house and when you go outside. Talk about where it might be found. If it is a verb, find ways to do the action either really or mime it, see if you can spot other people doing it? Or use adverbs and spend some time doing everything in the manner of the adverb, slowly/quickly/happily/etc.

39 Play Russian online language games (memory, click&tell, etc.) with your child

There are plenty of free online interactive language games for children. Find one that appeals to your child and encourage them to do a little every day. You can check out 3 different kinds of free Russian online language learning games here

 

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40 Try Skype lessons for children (may not be advised for infants and toddlers)

Many teachers are offering language lessons via Skype. Ask around and see if anyone can recommend a teacher to you. Sit in on the lesson too so you know what language to reinforce between lessons.

 

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41 Read bedtime stories in Russian to your child

Books, books, books. Kids love books and stories. Read stories in Russian before bed. Often when kids have heard a favorite story many times they know the words. Encourage your child to help tell the story.

42 Play Russian children’s games

Many children’s games are the same the world over, play kids games your child already knows in their 1st language but play it in the 2nd language. Paper, rock, scissors has many variations; play it in the 2nd language. Hopscotch, skipping games, clapping games etc. can all be played in any language. For more ideas have a look at the games in the different ‘countries and cultures’ at Dino Lingo (to the right of this post).

43 Get comic books & children’s magazines from Russia

Ask if a friend or relative overseas can send you comics or children’s magazines in Russian. Children’s magazines usually have lots of fun facts in them that you can talk about and further research. They also have quizzes and puzzles that are lots of fun to do.

44 Go to a national parade of the target culture

You could try to find where there is a large community of people from the target culture. They will no doubt have special events to celebrate the holidays of their country of origin. Take your child to their parades and festivals.

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45 Have a personalized notebook specially used for learning the2nd language(Don’t forget to use it to have your child draw whatever you say in the 2nd language

Let your child choose the notebook at the shop and decorate it anyway they want to make it special. Say words in Russian and have them draw pictures, or even write the word or the first letter, depending on what level they are at. Go back over the pictures every few days. Talk about the pictures and praise your child’s drawing skills.

46 Do local crafts

If you are a native speaker of Russian think about the crafts you did as a child and do them with your child (think also about how happy you were doing this activity with your own mother/father or your friends). Don’t worry if you have forgotten how, look on the Internet to refresh your memory. Perhaps you could send something your child makes to grandparents or relatives overseas.

47 Use chatting apps (WhatsApp, Line, etc.) to talk with friends and family who have same-aged children

Chatting apps are mobile and easy to use. Chat with friends in the 2nd who have children about the same age. Encourage your child to chat with them and their kids too. Ask their kids about themselves, their day etc. and encourage your child to talk about themselves.

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48 Sing lullabies in the 2nd language to put your baby asleep

Lullabies are so soothing for baby and parent. Sing some Russian lullabies to help your baby sleep. You can buy wind-up crib music at a baby store. Play the music and sing in the Russian. Establish is as a routine and enjoy the time holding your baby and knowing you are soothing him/her.

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49 Consider homeschooling by getting an online curriculum

More and more people are turning to homeschooling these days and there are plenty of resources online. Do some research and find something that suits you and your child. Depending on the school hours where you live, it may be possible for your child to attend the local school and follow a homeschooling curriculum.

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50 Send your child to a summer camp where he/she can study Russian in a short time.

Summer camp is a great experience for children. It is often their first extended time away from home and a chance to make lots of new friends and try a variety of activities for the first time. ‘Language’ camps for kids usually incorporate study with lots of games/crafts/activities related to the 2nd language culture. Look online or on the notice board in community centers and other public buildings.

 Russian Children’s books

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Russian learning for children – Russian teaching video

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8YSL97Xi8o&list=UUyeQeA1IAmduPh6paZszmyw&index=3&feature=plcp]

http://dinolingo.com Dino Lingo Russian for Kids is a Russian language learning set where cartoon dinosaur characters introduce the most common 200 words and phrases in Russian. It includes 5 Russian learning DVDs and a Russian flash card set.
effective Russian teaching program for children
Children can quickly learn and speak Russian, thanks to the award-winning lessons by Dino Lingo Kids

Dino Lingo Russian for Kids is an award-winning language teaching program pedagogically designed for small children.This program consists of 5 DVDs, 100 flash cards, posters and the parents guide.After watching the DVDs several times and playing with the flash cards, most children can easily name everyday objects and understand basic phrases in Russian. Dino Lingo Russian for Kids is suitable for all children between the ages of 2 to 7 years old.
Russian learning DVDs for kids
Dino Lingo Russian for Kids learning program teaches the most common 200 Russian words and phrases in 5 DVDs.

DVD 1 — Let’s Count : Numbers and colors / 35 min.
DVD 2 — Let’s Eat : Food, fruit and vegetables / 35 min.
DVD 3 — Let’s Play : Toys, house items, vehicles / 35 min.
DVD 4 — Let’s Jump : Verbs, actions and nature / 35 min.
DVD 5 — Let’s Learn : Family, body parts, and clothes / 35 min.
Daily conversations and animals are included in all five DVDs.
Russian learning flash cards for kids

Dino Lingo Russian learning flash cards teach the most common one hundred words in Russian. Each flash card set comes in a small clear box contains 100 flash cards.

Flash card set categories: Numbers, colors, food, fruit and vegetables, house items, body parts, family, clothes, vehicles and nature.
This picture dictionary has colorful photos of the most common 45 animals. Great to test your child’s learning progress and play “spot and name.”
Categories: Pets, farm animals, sea animals, wild animals, birds, insects and reptiles.
This poster has the most common fourty five animal cartoon images.
Categories: Pets, farm animals, sea animals, zoo animals, birds, insects and reptiles.

Sound of Russia – Russian culture fun facts for kids

Sounds of Russia

Russian music is heterophonic; this means that there is one melody among different voices. It is diverse in dialect, and the traditional music of Russia is folk music. There are ritual songs, nonritual songs, and instrumental music as well. The main instruments used are the schwam, horn trumpet, svirel, and kugikly. Most of the instruments are wind instruments, to create a specific sound. Russian music is typically personal and religious.

Read More

Russian Culture for Children– fun facts, food, music, language & more…

3 Common Children’s Games of Russia

1)      Brook: The children make pairs, and grab each other’s hands and hold them up. They create a brook, and the child without a partner stays in the front, closes his or her eyes, and walks through the brook to choose another partner. The two children walk to the end of the already formed brook, and they grab hands and put them up into the air. This should add on to the brook, and the child without a partner must do the same thing.

2)      Wizards: For this game, four or more children must take part in it. One child runs after all of the other children and tries to tag them. Whomever the tagger touches, they must freeze and scream “help me” until a child who has not been tagged can touch them and free them. This game is over when all of the kids have been tagged.

3)      P’yanitsa: This game consists of two to four players for this card game. The players attempt to collect all of the cards. One player lays down a high numbered card, and each player does the same thing. Whoever has the highest number when they throw it down gets the pile. The child with the most cards at the end of the game wins.

Common Russian Cuisine

1)      Borsch: Beet soup. Extremely common, famous for being a base soup in Russia. It is packed with vegetables and meat, and topped with a spoonful of sour cream. It can be eaten for lunch or an appetizer for dinner.

2)      Pirozkhi: Little pastries full of potatoes, cabbage, cheese, or a meat of choice. It can be an appetizer, a snack, or even dinner for small children.

3)      Bilini: this appetizer is so important; it is served every year on the first day of spring, at a festival called Maslenitsa. Bilini is served with jam, cheese, onions, caramel, or chocolate syrup. It is a pastry roll that children love.

3 Famous Desserts

1)      Morozhenoe: Russian ice cream. Children love ice cream in Russia, and it is often served with toppings like syrups, candy, nuts, or sprinkles. The ice cream comes in many flavors, and is a highlight for kids in Russia.

2)      Pashka: dried fruit, soft cheese almost like a marshmallow, combined with pastilla (candy, baked apples, honey).

3)      Medovie: eight layered honey cake with a sour cream and milk mixture filling. This is typically a pricey cake when made correctly, but a huge hit in Russia.

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3 Simple Recipes

1)      Russian Pancakes

  • Ingredients: 1 cup whole wheat flour, ½ cup white flour, 1.5 cups buttermilk, 1 egg, ½ tspbking soda, ½ tsp salt, 2 tsp sugar, 1 tsp vegetable oil
    • Directions: 1. using a whisk, mix the egg, salt, and sugar in a bowl, then add  buttermilk

2. Combine flour and baking soda in another bowl, and then add   to liquid   mixture

3. Mix until even, add vegetable oil to frying pan

4. Scoop mixture with spoon, add circular size mixture to pan. Fry until one side is golden, flip, repeat.

2)      Chicken Kabob

  • Ingredients: 2 lbs boneless chicken breast, ¼ cup vinegar, 11/4 cup red wine, 1 large sliced onion, salt and pepper 4 bay leaves, red peppers, cherry tomatoes, zucchinis
  • Directions: 1. Cut meat in cubes, slice the onion, transfer into pot.

2. Add all remaining ingredients. Mix well.

3. Cover the pot, put in refrigerator for a few hours.

4. Transfer meat on to skewers, alternate with vegetables. Grill on

Medium. Cook until brown. Serve.

3)      Kasha Varnishkas

  • Ingredients: ¼ lbs bow tie pasta, 1 cup kasha, 1 ¾ cups water, 1 large onion, 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Directions: 1. Cook pasta according to package instructions

2. Boil water; in the pot, toast kasha until heated, add boiling water

And salt

3. Cook until water evaporates, sautee onion in olive oil until

Caramelized

4. Mix pasta, kasha, and onion. Serve.

Children’s Day

June 1st, Russians honor small children and the youth with child proof, family oriented activities, speeches, programs, and events to enlighten everyone on the well-being of Russia’s youth. There are charities and events for abused children, and more child friendly shows on television on than any other day of the year. This day is a holiday for all Children of Russia.

Festivals and Holidays

1)      BeliyeNoche: Also known as white nights, Russians gather at the famous festival to celebrate the zenith of summer, when nonstop 24 hours of sunshine covers the city of St. Petersburg. This day occurs from June 11th to July 2nd. The tradition is to head to the rivers to watch the bridges raise, so that the boats can pass through. According to Russians and tourists, it is truly a breath taking site.

2)      New Year: The biggest celebration hands down, Russians prepare for this day weeks in advance. The belief is that “the way you celebrate the New Year will indicate how you will fare in the remainder of that year.” Russians bring in the New Year with their families, but after midnight is when they head to parties and clubs.

3)      Easter: A major holiday of Russia, Easter day changes each year depending on the lunar calendar. There is a feast, egg paintings, and religious meeting as well. Easter in Russia is a lot like Easter in the Western hemisphere.

Read More

Russian Attire

The traditional Russian women’s attire was created to shine a light on their dignity, and “emotional restraint.” Women work in their everyday clothing, but the clothing is still very beautiful. Red clothing is considered to be the most beautiful color. Canvas and wool clothing is decorated and embroidered with crosses, herring bones, and patterns of people and animals. The traditional colors are red, blue, green, white, and yellow.

Mens dress attire in Russia have a major rule that t shirts and shorts are almost never appropriate to wear in public unless you’re at a beach or a park. Denim jeans are way too casual for Russian men as well. Men dress in long trousers with a button up shirt and dress shoes. Dark clothes are very common for men.

Customs and Culture

  • Well-mannered Russians will not sit on the ground. In fact, it is against the law to sit on the grass in some parks.
  • Russians frown upon scratching any part of the body, blowing their nose without a handkerchief, littering, or standing with one hand in their pocket in public.
  • When crossing past an already seated person, cross face front (face to face) and not backside to face. It is rude.

Russian Fun Facts

  • Hockey and soccer are popular sports in Russia
  • Moscow is 3 hours ahead of London time, 8 hours ahead of New York
  • There are 10 million more women than men in Russia
  • The total length of the Kremlin walls is 2235 meters
  • The official name for Russia is the Russian Federation
  • Russia is the only country with 12 seas on its territory

3 Must See’s of Russia

1)      Golden Ring Cities: a line of cities northeast of Moscow, also known previously as Zaleyse. This place is home to monasteries, cathedrals, churches, and domes of the 18thcentury. It is one of the most beautiful, antique, and unique places to take your children to learn about history.

2)      Cat Theatre: a popular children’s theatre, a cast of home cats complete acrobatic tricks and stunts for the liking of all young children. There are also clowns and other side acts featured in the show, but most visitors come for the cats.

3)      Gorky Park: This park features a Russian spacecraft area and many other play areas as well. Older children come to Gorky Park for the rides, because there are plenty of them for everyone.

Sounds of Russia

Russian music is heterophonic; this means that there is one melody among different voices. It is diverse in dialect, and the traditional music of Russia is folk music. There are ritual songs, nonritual songs, and instrumental music as well. The main instruments used are the schwam, horn trumpet, svirel, and kugikly. Most of the instruments are wind instruments, to create a specific sound. Russian music is typically personal and religious.

Read More

Russian Attire – Clothes – Russian culture fun facts for kids

Russian Attire

The traditional Russian women’s attire was created to shine a light on their dignity, and “emotional restraint.” Women work in their everyday clothing, but the clothing is still very beautiful. Red clothing is considered to be the most beautiful color. Canvas and wool clothing is decorated and embroidered with crosses, herring bones, and patterns of people and animals. The traditional colors are red, blue, green, white, and yellow.

Mens dress attire in Russia have a major rule that t shirts and shorts are almost never appropriate to wear in public unless you’re at a beach or a park. Denim jeans are way too casual for Russian men as well. Men dress in long trousers with a button up shirt and dress shoes. Dark clothes are very common for men.

Read More

Russian children day – Russian culture fun facts for kids

Children’s Day

June 1st, Russians honor small children and the youth with child proof, family oriented activities, speeches, programs, and events to enlighten everyone on the well-being of Russia’s youth. There are charities and events for abused children, and more child friendly shows on television on than any other day of the year. This day is a holiday for all Children of Russia.

Festivals and Holidays

1)      BeliyeNoche: Also known as white nights, Russians gather at the famous festival to celebrate the zenith of summer, when nonstop 24 hours of sunshine covers the city of St. Petersburg. This day occurs from June 11th to July 2nd. The tradition is to head to the rivers to watch the bridges raise, so that the boats can pass through. According to Russians and tourists, it is truly a breath taking site.

2)      New Year: The biggest celebration hands down, Russians prepare for this day weeks in advance. The belief is that “the way you celebrate the New Year will indicate how you will fare in the remainder of that year.” Russians bring in the New Year with their families, but after midnight is when they head to parties and clubs.

3)      Easter: A major holiday of Russia, Easter day changes each year depending on the lunar calendar. There is a feast, egg paintings, and religious meeting as well. Easter in Russia is a lot like Easter in the Western hemisphere.

Read more

Russian Cuisine – food – Russian culture fun facts for kids

Common Russian Cuisine

1)      Borsch: Beet soup. Extremely common, famous for being a base soup in Russia. It is packed with vegetables and meat, and topped with a spoonful of sour cream. It can be eaten for lunch or an appetizer for dinner.

2)      Pirozkhi: Little pastries full of potatoes, cabbage, cheese, or a meat of choice. It can be an appetizer, a snack, or even dinner for small children.

3)      Bilini: this appetizer is so important; it is served every year on the first day of spring, at a festival called Maslenitsa. Bilini is served with jam, cheese, onions, caramel, or chocolate syrup. It is a pastry roll that children love.

3 Famous Desserts

1)      Morozhenoe: Russian ice cream. Children love ice cream in Russia, and it is often served with toppings like syrups, candy, nuts, or sprinkles. The ice cream comes in many flavors, and is a highlight for kids in Russia.

2)      Pashka: dried fruit, soft cheese almost like a marshmallow, combined with pastilla (candy, baked apples, honey).

3)      Medovie: eight layered honey cake with a sour cream and milk mixture filling. This is typically a pricey cake when made correctly, but a huge hit in Russia.

3 Simple Recipes

1)      Russian Pancakes

  • Ingredients: 1 cup whole wheat flour, ½ cup white flour, 1.5 cups buttermilk, 1 egg, ½ tspbking soda, ½ tsp salt, 2 tsp sugar, 1 tsp vegetable oil
    • Directions: 1. using a whisk, mix the egg, salt, and sugar in a bowl, then add  buttermilk

2. Combine flour and baking soda in another bowl, and then add   to liquid   mixture

3. Mix until even, add vegetable oil to frying pan

4. Scoop mixture with spoon, add circular size mixture to pan. Fry until one side is golden, flip, repeat.

2)      Chicken Kabob

  • Ingredients: 2 lbs boneless chicken breast, ¼ cup vinegar, 11/4 cup red wine, 1 large sliced onion, salt and pepper 4 bay leaves, red peppers, cherry tomatoes, zucchinis
  • Directions: 1. Cut meat in cubes, slice the onion, transfer into pot.

2. Add all remaining ingredients. Mix well.

3. Cover the pot, put in refrigerator for a few hours.

4. Transfer meat on to skewers, alternate with vegetables. Grill on

Medium. Cook until brown. Serve.

3)      Kasha Varnishkas

  • Ingredients: ¼ lbs bow tie pasta, 1 cup kasha, 1 ¾ cups water, 1 large onion, 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Directions: 1. Cook pasta according to package instructions

2. Boil water; in the pot, toast kasha until heated, add boiling water

And salt

3. Cook until water evaporates, sautee onion in olive oil until

Caramelized

4. Mix pasta, kasha, and onion. Serve.

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Russian children’s game – Russian culture fun facts for kids

3 Common Children’s Games of Russia

1)      Brook: The children make pairs, and grab each other’s hands and hold them up. They create a brook, and the child without a partner stays in the front, closes his or her eyes, and walks through the brook to choose another partner. The two children walk to the end of the already formed brook, and they grab hands and put them up into the air. This should add on to the brook, and the child without a partner must do the same thing.

2)      Wizards: For this game, four or more children must take part in it. One child runs after all of the other children and tries to tag them. Whomever the tagger touches, they must freeze and scream “help me” until a child who has not been tagged can touch them and free them. This game is over when all of the kids have been tagged.

3)      P’yanitsa: This game consists of two to four players for this card game. The players attempt to collect all of the cards. One player lays down a high numbered card, and each player does the same thing. Whoever has the highest number when they throw it down gets the pile. The child with the most cards at the end of the game wins. 

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Russian learning for children

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