Swedish Travel Destinations – Swedish Culture for kids

Sweden is a small country but with a lot of culture and a large variety of sights you do not want to miss out on. If you are the curious type who likes to visit the zoo and see wild animals, then perhaps meeting animals typical for the country you are visiting would suit you. The zoo called The Nordic Arc consist of endangered species in a grand archipelago environment located by Åbyfjorden in the province of Bohuslän. There are about 80 different species whom are accustom to the Swedish climate. Amongst others there are for example wolves, snow leopards and lynx, but also old Nordic country animals. You can also see endangered birds and frog species. The Nordic Arc is an organization who focus on giving endangered animals a future. They focus on breeding, research and education, and some of the animals are put back into their natural habitat.

All year around different activities takes place in the park, and you can get to meet the zoo keepers and participate in feeding the animals, or see the kitchen where the animals food is being prepared and learn more about what the animals eat and how to activate them. For children there are also crafts and games. To make the visit convenient for guests the park also has a hotel called Hotel Nordic Arc that has a variety of activities and places to stay. The Nordic Arc is open all year round to the public.

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As a kid you might of heard of or read books by the famous Swedish author Astrid Lindgren, the author behind one very popular character named Pippi Longstocking, amongst others. Astrid Lindgren was born in the town of Vimmerby in the province of Småland, In the same exact city you can visit the theme park Astrid Lindgren’s World, and meet the famous characters from her books in their fictional environment, such as Pippi Longstocking. Different events from Astrid Lindgrens books are performed in a theater and the events are being improvised to involve the children of the audience. Astrid Lindgrens World’s main focus is to stimulate children’s reading and writing. Astrid Lindgrens World is opened 9th of may til September 1st, and thereafter there are special opening hours.

If you are a person who want’s to be up on the go and enjoy high speed you do not want to miss out on the amusement park Liseberg in Gothenburg. It is one of the most visited amusement parks in Scandinavia. In 2005 it was chosen as one of the top ten amusements parks in the world by Forbes Magazine. And the roller coaster ride called Balder, was voted, both in 2003 and 2005, to be the best wooden tracked roller coaster in the world in a major international poll. Liseberg has over 30 different rides, everything from big roller coasters to smaller rides for young children. It also has various stages, a dance hall, restaurants, arcade halls and the Gasten Ghost hotel with human actors. Liseberg is open from 27th of April to October 6th, with a few exceptions.

The more historical seeking person should pay a visit to the Vasa museum in Stockholm. The former Swedish King Gustaf II Adolf had a ship called Vasa built. The intention was that she would be a great symbol for Sweden’s power within the military and politics. During the time when the Vasa ship was built it was one of the largest and heaviest war ships in the world. The Vasa ship sailed out on her maiden voyage the 10th of august 1628 in Stockholm harbor. Unfortunately the maiden voyage did not last very long, and the ship sank in Stockholm harbor. The reason  as to why the ship sank was because it was  too unstable to handle hard winds. Many attempts were made trying to salvage the ship, but not until 1961 the Vasa Ship broke the waves and was a piece of almost untouched 17th century. At the Vasa museum you can see the whole preserved ship, looking almost identical to what it looked like almost 400 years ago. The Vasa Ship museum is opened all year round with a few exceptions.

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If you enjoy ancient sights, Ale’s Stones is a must see. The monument is located in Scania in southern Sweden. A legendary king called King Ale is said to be buried there according to a folklore. The monument consist of a 67 by 56 meters stone ship made out of boulders of sandstone. Nobody knows for sure when Ale’s stones was created, but scientific beliefs are that it was created towards the end of the Nordic iron age.

A person who wish to experience the Swedish renaissance should visit Kalmar caste. The castle is located in the city of Kalmar in the province of Småland. The castle is the Nordics best preserved renaissance castle. The castle is dated back to the 12th century and is preserved in original condition and has not been changed since 1592. Visitors at Kalmar Castle have a lot to explore and they offer exciting ghost tours, guided tours in the dungeons, but also permanent exhibitions about the Castle and the city of Kalmar’s history. There are also different arrangements taking place all year round, for example a medieval festival in the summer time. Kalmar Castle is open all year round.

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Swedish Etiquette – Swedish Culture for kids

The Swedish people are mostly very friendly and open, even though it’s commonly known that Swedes are not a very warm people, but that might just be a misunderstanding due to the cold climate in Sweden and it having some sort of affect on the people. This is however not true. English speaking tourist’s visiting Sweden will notice how helpful most Swede’s are, even if you are not familiar with the Swedish language, that is not a problem because most Swede’s also speak English. Swede’s are however not very contact seeking, if Swede’s can avoid interaction with people they will strive for it. This is a widely known phenomena you would get to see for example on a bus. If there are two empty seats next to each other a Swede would pick a seat where the person would not have to sit next to anybody unless necessary. But most often if an elderly person comes on the bus or a mother with small children, it is common sense for most Swede’s to give up their seat. If you have a polite and friendly manner you will get the same in return.

Swedes are moralists by nature, but it’s a relaxed environment and gatherings such as dinners are often a formal affair. But it’s more common that guests are invited to a Swede’s home for coffee and cake. When it comes to gatherings whom you have been invited to, there are a few very important things to know about. It’s always important to make a good first impression, so make sure you are on time. It is considered extremely impolite not to be on time, on the other hand don’t arrive early either. Many Swede’s who arrive early to a dinner party etc. would rather sit in the car until the last minute then be too early.

Depending on what kind of gathering it is and how formal it is, don’t be surprised if you are asked to take your shoes off at the door. The more formal the party is the less risk is there of having to take your shoes off. Once inside it is not considered polite to ask the hostess if you could see the rest of the house, the Swede’s are in general very private when it comes to their home and if you are not offered a tour around the house, don’t expect to see all of it.

If you have been invited to a Swede’s home it’s important to bring the hostess a gift, for example a bouquet of flowers. If you chose to give flowers you have to make sure that the bouquet does not contain white lilies or chrysanthemums in it, because they are both the type of flowers you would give at funerals. If the family you are invited to has small children it would be an excellent idea that you give a little something to the children as well.

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During a dinner you don’t start eating until the hostess has started eating, and it’s considered rude if you leave food on your plate, therefor don’t take more food then you know you can eat. But also not to forget that it is not a very good idea to take the last piece of anything still remaining without making sure that everybody has had some and that nobody else want’s the last piece.

The Swede’s are people who work hard and in their spare time enjoy being away from it, therefor a topic not to bring up at a dinner would be discussing business, Swedes always try to distinguish between work and home. You do not bring your work home with you or take your home to work.

Although Sweden might come off as a country with a very firm etiquette on what to do and not to do, usually when children are involved it is always less formal, and most etiquette rules does not apply.

A typical gathering at a Swede’s home where children have also been invited, it is very common that the children are let to roam around and do as they please. But if children are at a formal event the common saying is ‘barn ska synas, men inte höras’ (“children are to be seen, but not heard”).

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Swedish Traditions and Holidays – Swedish Culture for kids

In the Swedish Culture, traditions and holidays are of big importance. Midsummer is the second most important holiday in Sweden, but for many it is the most important one. It’s celebrated on a Friday between the 20th and 26th of June, depending on which date is a Friday. Preferably, Midsummer is celebrated out in the countryside where Swedes gather to eat the traditional food and dance around a maypole, especially if children are involved in the celebration.

The traditional food commonly consist of pickled herring, boiled potatoes and sour cream, with strawberries for dessert. A tradition during midsummer that has been passed down for generations, is for young girls to go out in the middle of the night, and pick flowers. If a young girl picks seven different kinds of flowers and jump over seven hedges without speaking a single word, she will that night dream of her true love while sleeping, if she tuck the flowers under her pillow.

Swedish Christmas is the most important holiday in Sweden. Christmas is celebrated on December 24th and every year a unique tradition takes place. In most Swedish households it’s a tradition for the whole family to gather in front of the television at 3 pm local time and watch the television show ‘Kalle Anka och hans vänner önskar God Jul’ (“From All of Us to All of You”) more commonly known as ‘Kalle Ankas Jul’ (“Donald Ducks Christmas”). Donald Ducks Christmas is made up of a variety of short clips from different classic Disney movies, and has been broadcast every Christmas Eve since 1959. It is very important that you do not record this show, because it’s a holiday classic and that’s the only time you watch it. It is not uncommon for tourists visiting Sweden on Christmas Eve to notice that around 3 pm everybody disappears and the streets are quiet.

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Sweden has a big variety of other traditions and holidays as well. In February Fat Tuesday is celebrated by eating a pastry called ‘semla’ and Valentine’s day, also in February, but is not very popular in Sweden but it is recognized by merchants. For children, February also consist of a one week long break from school called ‘sportlov’ (“sports break”). It occurs between week 7 to 10 depending upon the county. On march 25th Swedes eat waffles, on what’s called ‘våffeldagen’ (“Waffle Day”).

 

In April Easter is celebrated in Sweden, and the tradition is built on the belief that witches traveled to ‘blåkulla’, originally for a sabbath with the Devil. Children honor Easter by dressing up as witches and knocking on doors in request for candy and by coloring eggs. Easter decorations are also widely popular such as bright colored feathers and chickens. On the last day of April Sweden celebrates ‘valborg’ (Walpurgis Night) to greet the spring. The tradition consist of having large bonfires and singing songs in celebration of the Spring.

For children the biggest weekly tradition is that candy is only allowed on Saturdays. It’s a tradition with the intent to prevent dental cavities, which is taken very seriously by many families, and by most of the society. For example most schools in Sweden from grade 1-6, do not allow any candy on school grounds.

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Facts About Sweden – Swedish Culture for kids

A key characteristic in Swedish culture is that Swedes are moralists by nature, yet very humble but find bragging or drawing attention to themselves unacceptable. But many Swedes would rather listen to somebody else then making their own voice heard. Normally, while speaking, a Swede would do so in a soft and calm way, it is rarely seen that a Swede shows strong emotions or showing anger in public because a Swede would avoid a conflict at any cost if possible.

A Swede is often seen as cold by nature, they don’t express any emotions and avoid contact with other people, but they are often misunderstood. Kindness is almost never taken for granted, but they will often say thanks, a person failing to do so is perceived as negative. In Sweden, behavior is strongly drawn to the word ‘lagom’ (“everything in moderation”), and Swedes strive towards the middle way. Therefor the conception work hard and play hard is not a part of being a Swede. Everything is done with moderation and nothing to the extreme. Most Swedes work hard but at the same time make sure to go out and enjoy themselves in their spare time. For children this also means that competition is not something that is encouraged, and most children are raised in a fashion where everybody is equal.

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Swedish Epic Stories for Kids

Swedish Epic Stories for Kids

 

Pippi Longstocking written by Astrid Lindgren is an advocate and heroine for young girls, and a rebel as well. She educates kids in her story on being themselves, and to believe that anything is possible. She challenges the strongest man in the world, “Mighty Adolph”, and can carry a horse all on her own. The story of Pippi Longstocking is a widely told tale in grade schools of Sweden.

Also an Astrid Lidgren classic, The Tomten is a widely enjoyed child story read in Sweden. In this story, it’s a cold and snowy winter night and the animals of Sweden are comforted by a small troll. The troll promises them that it will warm up and Spring will soon arrive. The troll brings unity and hope to the animals of the farm.

 

 

Swedish culture for children – Fun facts, food, music, language and more…

Swedish food  – Most Common Swedish Dishes

Potatoes are the main side to nearly every Swedish meal year round. Pancakes, soups, casseroles, and even whole buttered or sugared potatoes can be found on the plate in any Swedish home. As the main dish, one may also find kalops, or meat stew with onions, vegetables, and spices. The meat of choice is typically deer but can be and is not limited to smaller yet tougher meat. Served with the meat and potatoes is blodpudding, or blood pudding that is eaten with lingongberry jam and bacon.

Yum! Swedish Desserts! Swedish food

Two eggs, 1 1/4 cups of flour, a teaspoon of salt, and a little bit of butter creates a Swedish sweet treat. Pannkakar, or real Swedish pancakes are loved by both adults and children alike. Pepparkakor is another family favorite. Also known as, traditional Scandinavian sugar and spice cookies, it takes about an hour to create this tasty dessert but one moment to enjoy.  Apples, sugar, cinnamon, butter, flour and eggs creates a crustless Swedish apple pie. Children, parents, and their parents enjoy this dessert yearly as well.

Simple Swedish Recipes to Enjoy……

 

Real Swedish Pancakes

Ingredients: 2 eggs, 1 1/4 cup flour, 2-2 ½ cups of milk, 1 teaspoon of salt, butter

Directions: 1) mix eggs, flour, and salt

2) slowly add milk, beat batter smoothly

3) heat the skillet, add butter

4) fry pancakes on both sides

5) serve

 

Sugar Browned Potatoes

Ingredients: 2 tablespoons of butter, 2 tablespoons of sugar, 10 small peeled boiled potatoes,

½ teaspoon of salt

Directions: 1) melt butter in pan, stir in sugar

2) brown sugar to a golden color, do not burn

3) add potatoes, stir, sprinkle salt over caramel color potatoes

Swedish Rice Dessert

Ingredients: 2 cups mini marshmallows, 2 cups cooked/chilled rice, 1 (8 1/4 ounce) can of

Crushed pineapples, ½ cup of cherry halves, ½ cup toasted almonds, 1 cup of

Heavy cream, 1/4 cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon of vanilla

Directions: 1) combine all ingredients except heavy cream, sugar, and vanilla

2) slowly add sugar and vanilla

3) whip the cream

4) add rice to the cream

5) refrigerate and enjoy

Fun Swedish Games for Youth – Swedish culture for kids

Three fun activities that are played in Sweden go by the name of “Maypole”, “Blindbock”, and “Kubb”. Although maypole is a game that is popular to let children play on “May Day” in Sweden, many kids still engage in the activity on a regular spring day. For this game, an adult must erect a pole outside in dirt or sand so that it is sticking out, and tie six or seven ribbon ends to the pole. Allow the children to dance around the pole to music until all of their ribbons are completely wrapped around the pole. The pole will then be decorated. Another jovial activity called kubb, is compared to bowling, yet different in which the object is to knock over blocks by tossing sticks at them. It’s simple, yet a Swedish childhood favorite. Blindbock is compared to “Marco Polo,” the difference is that this game is played on solid ground and nobody hides. One child blindfolds the other child and spins them around two times. The child then has to tap another child, but there’s a catch to it. The child is still blindfolded and can only find another child to tap by listening to the sound of their voices. It challenges the child’s attention and hearing capabilities, but in a fun way.

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Children’s Day in Sweden

 

Children’s Day is often celebrated on various days by many countries around the world, but it is universally celebrated on November 20th. Sweden does not have their own personal date to celebrate children’s day. This day promotes the children of the world through health, mental, and emotional welfare. It celebrates childhood and the understanding of children.

 

Important Swedish Celebrations – Holidays in Sweden

 

Celebrate!!!!  Among many other celebrations and holidays of Sweden, the three most notable are Advent, All Saints Day, and Swedish Midsommar. The mark of the holiday season, also known as Advent, is one of the most important celebrations of Sweden. On this day, Swedish citizens visit churches and sing yule-tide songs. This is the beginning of the new year, and called “The First Sunday”. Children and adults decorate the streets, and light a candle every Sunday until Christmas during that month. A holiday to honor the deceased, Swedish “All Saints Day” is a popular and well known celebration on the first Saturday after October 30th. Wreathes and flowers are laid on loved ones resting areas and candles are lit. The celebration of most festivities known as Midsommar (midsummer), this is the warmest time and the days are lengthier. June 24th is the celebration of St. John the Baptist, and the Mayday is celebrated on the morning of Midsummer’s Eve. Decorations, dancing, food, and even magic occupy this time and celebration.

Swedish Clothing, fashion

 

Modern fashion has taken a toll on culture internationally, and Sweden is no exception. Hennes and Mauritiz, also known as H&M is headquartered in Sweden for example. Yet, something that stands out in Sweden from everywhere else is that it is not uncommon the least bit to see a Swedish civilian wearing a hat with a propeller on the top.

Swedish Traditions – Swedish culture for kids

 

On December 24th at 3 p.m. of every year, it is a tradition for the Swedish to watch “Donald Duck and his Friends Wish You a Merry Christmas,” or “Kalle Anka och hans vänner önskar en god jul.” June 6, 1916 began the first celebration of Swedish Flag Day. On this day, also called National Swedish Day, a boisterous celebration in which there is an array of blue and yellow flags as well as food, speeches, and activities are in the streets of Sweden. Crayfish happens to be one of the most sought out sea foods in Sweden during the month of August when the climate is warmer. At that time, it is tradition to have a “Crayfish Party.”

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Sounds of Sweden

 

Nordic folk dance music, polka, and polska are just three of many genres one may hear while listening to a Swedish radio station. Yet, they are the most popular of the culture, and with the music comes the instruments that creates it; the accordion, the clarinet, and the fiddle. These are the commonly used instruments of Sweden.

Places to See and Things to Do in Sweden for kids

 

Take the Kids and Your Parents Too!

Become acquainted with the wildlife at Lycksele Djurpark. This outdoor zoo is a hit with the children. Another fun spot to visit is Pite Hausbad. Pite Hausbad is home to many of Sweden’s water slides, a long and beautiful sandy beach, spas and pools. There are camps, hotels, and cabins. Pite Hausbad is popular and a huge tourist attraction in Sweden. Located in Stockholm, Sweden, Aquaria Water Museum lets children enjoy deep sea imagery as they spend time in an Amazon rain forest. Children can also interact with the Nordic sea animals, and look at the tropical waters. The serene scene is exactly what parents need, and what their children will enjoy.

Sweden Fun Facts

 

1) IKEA, a furniture making company that is internationally popular, was created in Sweden by a man named Ingvar Kamprod

2) The sun rises at 3:30 a.m. in the summer, and sets at 3:30 p.m. in the winter

3) On Easter, kids dress up as witches and go trick or treating

4) In Sweden, “a little” means “a lot”

5) There is no word in the Sweden language for “please”

6) Swedish is the most widely spoken of the Scandinavian languages

 

Swedish Epic Stories for Kids

 

Pippi Longstocking written by Astrid Lindgren is an advocate and heroine for young girls, and a rebel as well. She educates kids in her story on being themselves, and to believe that anything is possible. She challenges the strongest man in the world, “Mighty Adolph”, and can carry a horse all on her own. The story of Pippi Longstocking is a widely told tale in grade schools of Sweden.

Also an Astrid Lidgren classic, The Tomten is a widely enjoyed child story read in Sweden. In this story, it’s a cold and snowy winter night and the animals of Sweden are comforted by a small troll. The troll promises them that it will warm up and Spring will soon arrive. The troll brings unity and hope to the animals of the farm.

Swedish Culture for Children By DinoLingo Writer: La’Preea Smith.
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Swedish for kids, DVDs, CDs, books, flash cards and more

Sweden culture for children – Sweden Fun Facts

Sweden Fun Facts

 

1) IKEA, a furniture making company that is internationally popular, was created in Sweden by a man named Ingvar Kamprod

2) The sun rises at 3:30 a.m. in the summer, and sets at 3:30 p.m. in the winter

3) On Easter, kids dress up as witches and go trick or treating

4) In Sweden, “a little” means “a lot”

5) There is no word in the Sweden language for “please”

6) Swedish is the most widely spoken of the Scandinavian languages

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Places to See and Things to Do in Sweden for kids

Places to See and Things to Do in Sweden for kids

 

Take the Kids and Your Parents Too!

Become acquainted with the wildlife at Lycksele Djurpark. This outdoor zoo is a hit with the children. Another fun spot to visit is Pite Hausbad. Pite Hausbad is home to many of Sweden’s water slides, a long and beautiful sandy beach, spas and pools. There are camps, hotels, and cabins. Pite Hausbad is popular and a huge tourist attraction in Sweden. Located in Stockholm, Sweden, Aquaria Water Museum lets children enjoy deep sea imagery as they spend time in an Amazon rain forest. Children can also interact with the Nordic sea animals, and look at the tropical waters. The serene scene is exactly what parents need, and what their children will enjoy.

Swedish for kids, DVDs, CDs, books, flash cards and more