Turkish Songs for Children – Turkish Culture for kids

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1.  Mini Mini Bir Kus

Mini Mini Bir Kus Donmustu

Pencereme konmustu

Aldim onu iceriye

Cik cik cik cik otsun diye

Pir pir ederken canlandi

Ellerim bak bos kaldi…

2. Ali Babanin Cifligi

Ali Baba’nın bir çiftliği var

Ciftliğinde horozları var

Ü-ürü-ü diye bağırır

Ciftliğinde Ali Baba’nın

Ali Baba’nın bir çiftliği var

Ciftliğinde kuzuları var

Me-me diye bağırır

Ciftliğinde Ali Baba’nın.

Ali Baba’nın bir çiftliği var

Ciftliğinde köpekleri var

Hav-hav diye bağırır

Ciftliğinde Ali Baba’nın.

Ali Baba’nın bir çiftliği var

Ciftliğinde kedileri var

Miyav-miyav diye bağırır

Ciftliğinde Ali Baba’nın.

Ali Baba’nın bir çiftliği var

Ciftliğinde inekleri var

Mö-mö diye bağırır

Ciftliğinde Ali Baba’nın.

Ali Baba’nın bir çiftliği var

Ciftliğinde çocukları var

Ha ha ha ha diye bağırır

Ciftliğinde Ali Baba’nın.

3. Daha Dun Annemizin Kollarinda

Daha dun annemizin

kollarιnda yaşarken

Çiçekli bahçemizin

Yollarιnda koşarken

Şimdi okullu olduk

Sιnιflarι dordulduk

Sevinçliyiz hepimiz

yaşasιn okulumuz.

4. Bak Postaci Geliyor

Bak postacı geliyor

Selam veriyor

Herkes ona bakıyor

Merak ediyor

Çok teşekkür ederim

Postacı sana

Pek sevinçli haberler

Getirdin bana

Bu gün yalnız bu kadar

Darılmayınız

Yarın yine gelirim

Hoşçakalınız

Haydi git güle güle

Uğurlar olsun

Ellerin dert görmesin

Kısmetle dolsun

5. Küçük Ayşe

Küçük Ayşe, küçük Ayşe

Napıyorsun bana söyle?

Bebeğime bakıyorum,

Ona ninni söylüyorun.

Küçük asker, küçük asker,

Napıyorsun bana söyle?

Tüfeğimi çatıyorum,

Vatanımı bekliyorum.

Ben askere gidiyorum

6. Horozumu Kaçırdılar

Horozumu Kaçırdılar

Damdan Dama Aşırdılar

Suyunda Pilav Pişirdiler

Bili Geh Geh Geh Güzel Horozum

Horozumun Beş Pençesi

Tavukların Eğlencesi

Evde Boş Kaldı Kümesi

Bili Geh Geh Geh Güzel Horozum

Horozum Da Yağlıyıdı

Kümesine Bağlıyıdı

Çil Tavuğun Oğluyudu

Bili Geh Geh Geh Güzel Horozum

7. Kucuk kurbaga

Küçük kurbağa, küçük kurbağa, kulağın nerede ?

Kulağım yok kulağım yok yüzerim derede

Ku vak vak vak ku vak vak vak kuvak kuvak kuvak

Küçük kurbağa, küçük kurbağa, kuyruğun nerede ?

Kuyruğum yok kuyruğum yok yüzerim derede

Ku vak vak vak ku vak vak vak kuvak kuvak kuvak

Küçük kurbağa, küçük kurbağa, yelkenin nerede ?

Yelkenim yok yelkenim yok yüzerim derede

Ku vak vak vak ku vak vak vak kuvak kuvak kuvak

Küçük kurbağa, küçük kurbağa, gözlerin nerede ?

Gözlerim yok gözlerim yok yüzerim derede

Ku vak vak vak ku vak vak vak kuvak kuvak kuvak

8. Dag Basini duman almis

Dağ başını duman almış

Gümüş dere durmaz akar

Güneş ufuktan şimdi doğar

Yürüyelim arkadaşlar

Sesimizi yer, gök, su dinlesin

Sert adımlarla her yer inlesin

Bu gök, deniz nerede var

Nerede bu dağlar taşlar

Bu ağaçlar güzel kuşlar

Yürüyelim arkadaşlar

Sesimizi yer, gök, su dinlesin

Sert adımlarla her yer inlesin

9. Uyusun da buyusun nenni

Dandini dandini dastana

Danalar girmis bostana

Kov bostanci danayi

Yemesin lahanayi

Eee eee eee e

Eee eee eee e

Dandini dandini danali bebek

Mini mini elleri kinali bebek

Annesi babasi cok sever

Uyusun da buyusun nazli bebek

Eee eee eee e

Eee eee eee e

Dandini dandini danadan

Bir ay dogmus anadan

Kacinmamis yaradan

Mevlam korusun nazardan

Eee eee eee e

Eee eee eee e

Uyusun da buyusun nenni

Tipis tipis yurusun nenni

Okula da gitsin nenni

Uyu da buyu yawrum nenni

10. Yag satarim bal satarim

Yağ satarım

Bal satarım

Ustam öldü ben satarım

Ustam öldü kürkü var

Satmam 15 liraya

Yağ satarım

Bal satarım

Yağlıca ballıca dayak atarım

Turkish Travel Destinations – Turkish Culture for kids

 

Turkey is a very popular place people choose to vacation at. Most people go to the beach towns on the South coast, like Marmaris, Bodrum, Alanya and Kusadasi. This is where the parties are and the beaches. But there are also castles to visit, like the big castle in Bodrum, museums, mosques, countryside to see, and even mud baths.

Pamukkale is a beautiful place to visit.  It has beautiful white cliffs and waterfalls.Near to Pamukkale is the ancient city of Ephesus, with has  lots of old ruins to explore.

Capadoccia is a beautiful place as well. It’s made up of a rocky landscape, made that way by three old volcanoes that made the land all craggy. You can go in a hot air balloon over the land, and see it from up high.

Istanbul is a wonderful city, and it’s very big. There are lots of mosques, like the beautiful Blue Mosque, old buildings, palaces, and a big, colourful market, called The Grand Bazaar. Everybody gets lost in The Grand Bazaar, because it’s so big.

In the South-East of the country life is very different, with old villages. These are quite far away from the popular places.

There are other big cities you can visit too, like Izmir, Adana and the capital, Ankara.

Anyone who visits Turkey must have a Turkish bath, or ‘hamam’. First of all, you sit in a very hot room called a sauna, and sweat a lot.Then you lay on a slab and your skin is scrubbed clean, with lots of soapy water and suds. It’s a fun thing to do, and you feel really clean and relaxed afterwards.

Turkish Music – Turkish Culture for kids

Belly dancing is very popular in Turkey. The music is authentic Turkish music, with instruments like ‘tef’, which is a tambourine, and the zither.

The zither is in the shape of a box, with strings across it, and it is played by using a pick, to strum, like a guitar.

Folk music is very popular in Turkey. Lots of instruments are used in folk music, such as bağlama, which is an instrument with strings, which looks a bit like a guitar with no hole, tulum, which is like a Scottish bagpipe and you have to blow into it to make a loud noise, and sipsi, which is an long tube you blow into, a bit like a clarinet.

Belly dancing music usually has drums (tabla) and sometimes the belly dancer has little cymbals on their fingers, which they click to the music.

Common Turkish Children’s Names – Turkish Culture for kids

Here are some popular boys’ names:

  • Ali

  • Ahmed/Ahmet

  • Mehmet – very popular!

  • Ibrahim, and sometimes ‘Ibo’ for short

  • Murat

  • Koray

  • Cem. When you talk to someone with this name, you call them ‘Jem’, because the letter ‘c’ is said like a ‘j’ in Turkish.

Some popular girls’ names are:

  • Yasemin

  • Aysun, which means ‘beautiful as the moon’ in Turkish

  • Mira

  • Yazmira

  • Ceren

Like you and me, Turkish people have a first name and a second name. A first name in Turkish is called ‘ad’ and the second name, or surname, is ‘soyadı’.

So, for example – a boy might be called Mehmet Ozturk. His ‘ad’ would be Mehmet, and his ‘soyadı’ would be Ozturk.

When a girl marries a boy, she changes her surname, or ‘soyadı’ to be the same as his, just like most men and women in the US.

History of Turkey – Turkish History for kids

Turkey has been around for a long time , so it has plenty of history. A very famous man, called Mustafa Kemal, is a Turkish hero. He is now called Ataturk, which means ‘Father of the Turks’. All over Turkey, you’ll see statues of him. Ataturk is like a celebrity, because back in 1923, he founded the Turkish Republic. This means that Turkey was made its own country, and did not have to answer to anyone. Ataturk was the president, and made lots of good changes for the Turkish people.

Way before Ataturk came along, Turkey had lots of battles that was very impacting on this countries history.Hundreds of years ago, many countries were trying to rule the world, fighting over who would be the most powerful and own the most land. Turkey had its own empire, called the Ottoman Empire. This was a very big empire, which started off very small and grew much bigger. A man called Osman built this empire and it lasted for 600 years.Ataturk was the man who ended the Ottoman Empire, when he made Turkey a Republic.

Turkey has become mostly a peaceful country even though its past is filled with many violent battles.When Ataturk became President, he changed lots of things about life in Turkey, and the Turkish people still thank him for all the changes he made when he was president; this is why you see lots of statues and pictures of him in this country.

Fun Facts About Turkey – Turkish Facts for kids

Turkey has more than 75 million people that live there. The biggest city is called Istanbul. Here you can cross a bridge, called the Bosphorus Bridge, from Europe, into Asia. There’s even a sign saying ‘welcome to Europe’ going one way, and ‘welcome to Asia’ going the other.

Even though Istanbul is the biggest city, it isn’t the capital city; that is called Ankara. Ankara is where all the Government buildings are.The people of Turkey are very friendly, and love to show people their language, food and music.

Most Turkish people are Muslims. In towns and villages, you’ll see lots of mosques, which are like churches, and have tall towers called minarets. At different times of the day, you’ll hear a sound coming from the mosque; this is called ‘call to prayer’ or “ezan” in Turkish, when the people go to the mosque to pray.

Turkish Culture Facts for Children, Food, Clothes, Values, Music, Communication, Travel, Stories, Festivals and More

Turkish Culture

Food

For centuries, Turkish khans and sultans had their own chefs prepare the tastiest dishes for them, which also influenced today’s popular Turkish food. Considered to be a combination of Central Asian, Balkan, and Middle Eastern cuisine, Turkish kitchen offers a variety of tastes ranging from mildly spicy Middle Eastern dishes to delicious olive oil appetizers that are truly Mediterranean. Each region in Turkey also contributes to the richness of Turkish food. In Anatolia, beans are cooked quite often whereas corn based dishes can be served in every meal in the Black Sea Region.

3 things everyone should know about Turkish food culture are Ekmek (bread), Chai (Black Tea) and Sofra Adabi (Eating Manners). First, ekmek, which is similar to French baguette, is present in every meal because Turks love eating bread with almost anything. Second, each meal includes or is followed by a cup of black tea and Turkey ranks as #4 in the world in tea consumption. Third, Turkish people put special emphasis on eating manners at the table (actually, throughout the history, most of the people ate meals on the floor with a big round pan called “tepsi”). Everyone should wait till the oldest person starts eating and recite “besmele” before the meal.

A typical Turkish breakfast includes ekmek (bread), tea (black tea), jam (recel), feta cheese (peynir), olives (zeytin), butter (tereyagi). Of course, lunch and dinner can vary but soups and boiled vegetables in tomato sauce are extremely common where ever you go. Lastly, all dinners must include a Turkish dessert like baklava or kadayif (desserts that are made of thin layers of pastry soaked in honey). In the picture simit (crispy and cruchy round bread with sesame seeds) and Turkish coffee (hot coffee served in small cups and extra-fine grounds in it)

Clothes

Just like any other developed country, modern Turks wear casual dresses in Western style. Traditionally though, Turkish clothes were similar to dresses in Caucasia and were made by cotton, silk and wool because of relatively cooler climate. The areas Turks lived in throughout the history are close to Silk Road, so this might also have contributed to the clothing culture. During the Ottoman Empire, some women wore “ferace” (gray or black one-piece fabric that covers most of the body) and some men wore “shalvar” (loose pants) and different headdresses based on their social status. The sultans had large white silk sash wound over the head and decorated with rubies and feathers called “kavuk”. There are local costumes that are mostly worn during local festivals and celebrations. You can check out some examples here: http://www.google.com/images?q=folklor+kiyafetleri

Festivals, Holidays and Celebrations

There are two types of holidays in Turkey: Milli Bayramlar (Festivals that mark the victories during the independence war after the WWI) and Dini Bayramlar (Festivals  that are related with religious traditions; namely, Ramazan Bayrami and Kurban Bayrami).

Ramazan Bayrami, also known as Eid-al Fitr, is celebrated at the end of Ramadan for 4 days. During Ramazan Bayrami, all family members get together, elderly are visited and little children are given candies. Whenever you visit someone’s home during Ramazan Bayrami, you can be assured you will be served some home-made baklava.

Kurban Bayrami, aka Eid-al Adha, is the commemoration of profit Ibrahim’s willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail for God. Traditionally, this festival is celebrated by most of the Turks and is the second major national holiday. During this festival, an animal is sacrificed and most of the meat is given to the poor, needy and the neighbors. Families and relatives gather and cook the meat all together while enjoying this celebration.

Famous Stories, Epics

There are many folk tales, epic poems and important novels in Turkish literature. Five of the most commonly known characters are Koroglu, Dede Korkut, Karagoz & Hacivat and Nasreddin Hoca.

Epic of Koroglu: Is the story where the son of a blind horse trainer avenges a wrongdoing. One day a horse trainer spots a unique horse and tells the head of the clan that it makes a perfect gift for the king. However, the head of the clan thinks the horse-trainer is making fun of him as the little colt looks tiny and weak. The head of the clan orders the horse trainer to be blinded. The son of the horse trainer Koroglu (translates as “The son of the blind man”) grows up and trains that tiny horse to be a great stallion. Finally Koroglu rides the stallion and punishes the head of the clan because of his mistake.

Dede Korkut Stories: Dede Korkut is an old wise man who resolves important problems and gives others advice to handle with conflicts. Some of the Dede Korkut stories are related with monsters, ferries, heroes and supernatural creatures.

Karagoz & Hacivad: are the two major characters in the traditional Turkish shadow play. In the play, the colorful string-puppets move behind a screen which is made of very thin camel or cow skin. Karagoz is less educated and straight-forward where Hacivad is calmer and smarter.

Nasreddin Hoca: is a public figure from Central Anatolia who supposedly lived in 13th century. Nasreddin Hoca always makes witty remarks about what is happening around him. The way Turks put it, his jokes not only entertain you but also make you think deeply at the same time. One of his famous jokes is about his fall from the donkey he was riding. After he apparently falls off the donkey, he smiles and goes on to say, “I was going to get off anyways…”

Children’s Games

Because of the young population of Turkey,  it is so common to see children playing social games on the street. Perhaps the three most popular games are Korebe, Saklambac and Uzun esek.

Korebe (blind catcher) is a game where “ebe” (it) tries to catch other kids while blindfolded. The kid that gets to be caught or touched by “ebe” becomes the next “ebe.”

Saklambac is the Turkish version of hide-n-seek.

Uzun Esek (long donkey) is played mostly by boys. In this game, simply players jump over the back of an ebe (it). In some different versions of the game, just like riding a donkey, players get to sit on the back of the ebe for a short while.

Communication

It is hard to summarize verbal and nonverbal communication of a culture in one paragraph but if you are travelling to Turkey, there are few unique communication styles you must be aware of. As a beginner, you are expected to use a politer language to the people who are older than you and whom you are meeting for the first time (e.g., you should say “siz” (plural “you”) instead of “sen” (singular “you”)). Secondly, make sure that you always use honorifics to address people who are older than you or have important social status: such as “agbi” (older brother) , “abla” (older sister), “bey” (similar to “Mr.”). Thirdly, expect that sometimes the messages will be communicated with eye and hand gestures with no words: for insatnce disapproval can be communicated by looking straightly in the eye. Lastly, don’t forget that in Turkey friendships can develop so quickly. A Turkish person might count you as a friend even if you just chat with him or her for 10 minutes while waiting in a line.

Values

Turkish people put family and relatives before everything. Family members meet in every occasion and every single family member is supported without question. Turkish people also are known to be very hospitable, they might invite you to their houses and share the meal with you even if they don’t know you. There is a saying in Turkey that goes “stranger at the doorstep is the God’s guest”.

Similarly, Turks like to be in contact with friends and relatives; it is not uncommon to have guests come over more than a few times a week.  As an indication of the strong links among friends, Turkey has the highest number of Facebook users in the world compared with the internet penetration in this country.

Fun Facts

Did you know that there is a tradition in Turkey called “el opmek” which is kissing the hand of elderly as a sign of respect?

Did you know, in some regions of Turkey, brides come to wedding ceremony riding on a horse as a tradition?

Did you know that Santa Claus was actually born and lived in Turkey?

Did you know that some researchers located Noah’s ark in Eastern Turkey?

Did you know that half of Istanbul is in Europe and the other half is in Asia?

Did you know that the ancestors of modern Turks lived in Central Asia and Turkish language structure is similar to Japanese and Korean?

Some famous Turkish people are Orhan Pamuk (Nobel prize winner in literature), Muhtar Kent (CEO of Coca-Cola), Mehmet Oz (TV personality & cardiothoracic surgeon), Muzaffer Sherif (Yale psychologist), Ahmet Ertegun (founder & president of Atlantic Records).

Famous places to see

Topkapi Palace

Blue Mosque

Hagia Sophia

Sunken Cistern

Dolmabahce Palace

Ephesus Antic City

Pamukkale

Cappadocia

Trojan Horse

Read more

Turkish Culture for Children – fun facts,

Fun Facts

Did you know that there is a tradition in Turkey called “el opmek” which is kissing the hand of elderly as a sign of respect?

Did you know, in some regions of Turkey, brides come to wedding ceremony riding on a horse as a tradition?

Did you know that Santa Claus was actually born and lived in Turkey?

Did you know that some researchers located Noah’s ark in Eastern Turkey?

Did you know that half of Istanbul is in Europe and the other half is in Asia?

Did you know that the ancestors of modern Turks lived in Central Asia and Turkish language structure is similar to Japanese and Korean?

Some famous Turkish people are Orhan Pamuk (Nobel prize winner in literature), Muhtar Kent (CEO of Coca-Cola), Mehmet Oz (TV personality & cardiothoracic surgeon), Muzaffer Sherif (Yale psychologist), Ahmet Ertegun (founder & president of Atlantic Records).

Famous places to see

Topkapi Palace

Blue Mosque

Hagia Sophia

Sunken Cistern

Dolmabahce Palace

Ephesus Antic City

Pamukkale

Turkish Culture for Children – fun facts, Children`s Games

Children`s Games

Because of the young population of Turkey,  it is so common to see children playing social games on the street. Perhaps the three most popular games are Korebe, Saklambac and Uzun esek.

Korebe (blind catcher) is a game where “ebe” (it) tries to catch other kids while blindfolded. The kid that gets to be caught or touched by “ebe” becomes the next “ebe.”

Saklambac is the Turkish version of hide-n-seek.

Uzun Esek (long donkey) is played mostly by boys. In this game, simply players jump over the back of an ebe (it). In some different versions of the game, just like riding a donkey, players get to sit on the back of the ebe for a short while.